Snoring Logs / Roncando Troncos

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

It’s no wonder San Geraldo gets confused when he speaks Spanish, I’m still trying to teach him English.

San Geraldo woke up from a siesta. Moose loves to join him. He told me, “Musy [that’s Moose’s official name] is still snoring logs.”

“Sawing logs,” I corrected.

“What?” he asked.

“Sawing logs, not snoring logs,” I said, thinking he would realize his error.

“Why sawing?” he asked, as if it were the most ridiculous phrase.

I mimed cutting a log with a saw and making the noise that goes with it.

“Oh, it makes the same sound!”

It’s not the first time I’ve corrected him, but it is the first time I’ve explained it.

No es de extrañar que San Geraldo se confunda cuando habla español, todavía estoy tratando de enseñarle inglés.

San Geraldo despertarse de una siesta. Alce le encanta unirse a él. Me dijo: “Musy [ese es el nombre oficial de Moose] todavía está aserrando troncos”. (Nota: La expresión en inglés es “aserrando troncos”, que significa roncando (porque suena como el ruido que se hace al aserrar troncos.)

“Serrando troncos”, corregí.

“¿Qué?” preguntó.

“Serrando troncos, no roncando troncos”, dije, pensando que se daría cuenta de su error. [Nota: En inglés serrar es “to saw” y “roncar” es “to snore.” Suenan similar.]

“¿Por qué serrando?” preguntó, como si fuera la frase más ridícula.

Imité cortar un tronco con una sierra y hacer el ruido que la acompaña.

“¡Oh, hace el mismo ruido!”

No es la primera vez que lo corrijo, pero es la primera vez que lo explico.

Listen to the audio (full volume if you dare). It’s San Geraldo “snoring” logs.
Escucha el audio (volumen completo si te atreves). Es San Geraldo “roncando troncos.”

Another photo of Moose and Dudo. Dudo doesn’t snore. / Otra foto de Moose y Dudo. Dudo no ronca.

Fifteen Tapas

It seems a day out on the town, any town, is not complete without us stumbling upon a really great restaurant. After Mariposario de Benalmádena (Benalmádena’s Butterfly Park, see two previous posts), we continued another 5 minutes into Benalmádena Pueblo (the old village). Having only been there once before (click here for my first visit), I was familiar with only one little cafe, so we parked the car and began to head downhill through town.

It was a quiet and gloriously sunny winter day already past 2:00, which meant even the stores that might be open this time of year were closed for siesta. We thought, before settling down to lunch, we’d check out Plaza de España, a charming historic plaza. There were a couple of nice-looking restaurants. We chose the second one we came to, Restaurante Plaza.

It was warm enough in the sun to enjoy a meal out on the terrace, but the cloud of cigarette smoke hovering all around decided us to head inside. We headed up some stairs to a room with terraced windows that looked out onto another street. Service was a pleasure and the menu was varied and unusual. We each chose our own three tapas and we were definitely not disappointed.

HAMBERGUESA DE CHIVO
(GOAT HAMBURGER)
MUSHROOMS AND STUFF… (I CAN’T REMEMBER WHAT
IT WAS CALLED, BUT IT WAS REALLY GOOD).
CRUJIENTE DE SALMON, QUESO DE CABRA, Y BOK CHOI.
(CRISPY SALMON WITH GOAT CHEESE.)
SALMON WASN’T CRISPY, JUST PASTRY IT WAS WRAPPED IN.

Numbers in another language can sometimes cause confusion. San Geraldo ordered his tapas by number. Cuatro (Four), Once (Eleven), and Diez y Cinco (supposed to be, but not, Fifteen). Since he was pointing to the items as he ordered, the waiter nodded and took down the information. When Judy ordered, she followed San Geraldo’s lead and requested Diez y Cinco. The waiter was a bit further away. He hesitated and looked at me. I said she didn’t want both Diez y Cinco (Ten and Five), she wanted Quince (Fifteen). The waiter laughed. San Geraldo laughed. And Judy said, “Well, that’s what I get for following Jerry’s lead!”

RESTAURANTE PLAZA, PLAZA DE ESPAÑA,
BENALMÁDENA PUEBLO.
HEADING BACK TO THE CAR.
THE SCENIC ROUTE, A DIEZ-Y-CINCO–MINUTE WALK.

The Finger

Our dear friend Tynan was teasing San Geraldo while we had coffee the other morning. He does that regularly. Mostly because it’s so easy to do.

Finally, San Geraldo began to threaten, “You know, Mr. T [he likes to call him Mr. T], you’re on a frozen lake, and the ice is thick, and you’re going further and further, and you’re getting to open water, and you’re about to drop in…”

“Jerry,” I interrupted, “You really could just say, ‘You’re skating on thin ice.’ “

“Oh.”

MEANWHILE, MOOSE WATCHES THE DRAIN
(FOR TINY BIRDS THAT WILL NEVER, I HOPE, SQUEEZE THEIR WAY THROUGH).

The Finger
A few minutes later, San Geraldo surprised us with his knowledge of a contemporary, popular singer. Tynan, as I’ve mentioned before, is from Chesterfield in the English Midlands. Most people would agree that Tynan’s accent is sometimes difficult to understand (well, most people have said a lot worse).

Tynan said, “You’ve got the finger on the pulse of youth, you.”

A confused San Geraldo repeated what he heard, “You’re fingering the pulse of me???”




After all that, I joined Moose and Dudo at the drain.


MUCH LATER… DUDO STILL AT IT.

Ah-EH-row Eh-SHMEET

I love mispronunciations!

Remember Rode Eh-STEE-gwar (click here if you don’t know the story from back in May 2012).

I’m not passing any judgments and never would. After all, my father used to smoke GAR-shuh VAY-guz. (That would be Garcia y Vega to a Spaniard.)

Our Spanish friend Tere once told me that one of her favorite British actresses is EhLAYna Bone-HAHN Carr-TEHRRR.

As you know, San Geraldo provides me with constant entertainment in his multiple languages (well, his attempts at multiple languages).

But this, for a change, is not about San Geraldo. This is about another Spanish friend who was recently telling me about the American rock groups he loves. His favorite?

No, it’s not Metallica. (Dream on!)

His favorite American rock group is Ah-EH-row Eh-SHMEET!

Dream until your dreams come true!

Your Spanish Friend

A few weeks ago, I told you about my long weekend in Madrid staying with Guadalupe (click here for the last of several posts on that trip).

Guadalupe and a few of her friends can communicate fairly well in English. Other of her friends are fluent — and probably have a much better academic knowledge of English grammar than I do… than do I… than I… In addition, some are also fluent in French, German, and Italian. One friend is even fluent in Hebrew. All I could remember how to say in Hebrew was, “What’s this?,” “I go to Hebrew school,” and “Koopy is a good monkey.” Phonetically, that’s “Koopy cove tove,” if it ever comes up in conversation.

Putting Koopy aside… The core group of five professional women started a business together called “Your Spanish Friend.” They host people in their homes and offer a few days or more of immersion in Spanish conversation while sharing the city of Madrid from an insider’s view.

This all sounds like an advertisement and I don’t mean it to be that. I just thought I’d let you know about it in case you’re interested. Although Guadalupe and I had recently become friendly, we weren’t close friends and really didn’t know each other very well. I agreed to go up for a visit and was kind of nervous about staying in someone else’s home (not my favorite way to travel) and spending so much time in such close proximity to a fairly new acquaintance. I also love to travel independently, so didn’t know how I felt about being taken around Madrid by someone else.

The entire visit was a revelation. First, the homes are large and elegant. I had my own beautiful room and private bath. I know people with apartments smaller than that. So, staying in Guadalupe’s house was like staying in an elegant B&B — with the added benefit of feeling part of a family (and being able to eat whenever I wanted). We spent the entire weekend speaking only Spanish. At times, my Spanish was comical, but I can’t believe how much I improved, and how relaxed I was the entire time.

YOUR SPANISH FRIEND(s).

You may remember the photo I shared of Guadalupe and her friends. They are all gracious, fascinating, classy, relaxed, warm, kind, funny, knowledgable. I could go on an on. I fell in love. I told San Geraldo even he (yes, even he) would have had a great time.

This is not a shameless plug since it’s not about me. Check them out at www.YourSpanishFriend.com and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/YourSpanishFriend. (You may recognize some of the photos. I sent all of mine to Guadalupe.)

AND JUST THINK, AFTER YOUR TIME IN MADRID,
YOU CAN VISIT THE COSTA DEL SOL AND WAKE UP TO THIS.
CLICK THE IMAGES TO FILL THE SCREEN WITH SUNRISE (AND FRIENDS).

Koopy
During your next trip to Spain I know you’ll be asked about Koopy the monkey (he comes up all the time, as you can imagine): When asked, all you need to say is:“Koopy es un buen mono,” because Koopy is a good monkey.