May Day Mayday

It’s a holiday again in Sevilla. Well, this time it’s a holiday in many parts of the world. Many countries observe May Day as International Workers’ Day. Here it’s called Día del Trabajador (Workers’ Day or Labor Day). In 1977, after the end of the Franco regime, it became an official national holiday traditionally used by trade unions and parties for social and labor change. There are protests all over the country (especially this year due to the economic crisis, which is causing the government to cut funding for education, healthcare, workers’ compensation, and much more).

 

The street in front of the government building on our plaza is cordoned off and being monitored by three teams of police. So far, the protest hasn’t reached us. I took a walk over to Plaza de la Encarnación (home of the Metropol Parasol) to find a large, peaceful demonstration. I took some pictures and decided to make my exit. I’m a guest in this country and I like it here. I don’t want to get caught in the middle of anything that could get me booted out. So, I strolled back-streets to reach my new favorite restaurant/café where I wet my parched whistle with a small glass of sherry. I’ll tell you all about that tomorrow.

 
 
 

Author: Moving with Mitchell

From Brooklyn, New York; to North Massapequa; back to Brooklyn; Brockport, New York; back to Brooklyn... To Boston, Massachusetts, where I met Jerry... To Marina del Rey, California; Washington, DC; New Haven and Guilford, Connecticut; San Diego, San Francisco, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Irvine, California; Sevilla, Spain. And Fuengirola, Málaga..

19 thoughts on “May Day Mayday”

  1. Hello Mitch:
    Well, although we think of Budapest as the city of protests as there seems to be one nearly every day, today it has been 'All Quiet on the Eastern Front'.

    As you say, as guests in the countries in which we live, we too feel that it is unwise to become too closely involved with political demonstrations. There are enormous problems all over Europe, we are afraid to say, but somehow the old adage of only spending what you can afford does not seem to have been adhered to in the days of plenty and now the results are only too apparent.

    1. J&L:
      The problems are so complex (and have been building for so long) and any solution is going to be so painful that I don't expect this to be a very easy year for most people, no matter the country. I'm grateful to be here and I look forward to better times. In the meantime, I will definitely keep a safe distance from any protests.

  2. Democracy at its best! I just LOVE that colourful government building in your plaza! What a great thing to wake up to!

  3. There is never a dull moment in Sevilla! I think I'd be exhausted by the pace of life there. Glad you can keep up with satisfying the interests of your many bloggie followers!

    1. Ms. Sparrow:
      Ah. yes, the frenetic pace and all the obligations! Sleep until 9 or 10. Breakfast until noon. Take a stroll. Go out for lunch. Have a siesta. Take pictures. Blog. Study Spanish. (We're now trying to get some structure back into our lives.)

  4. And we in France have the added bonus of a presidential election on Sunday. So May Day was full of all kinds of political shenanigans. Ugh, please let it be over!

    1. Walt the Fourth:
      Political shenanigans are the some all over, aren't they (well, when you compare "free" societies). I hope France isn't as TV advertising heavy as the US!

    2. No, nowhere near it. In fact, the campaign is fairly regulated to ensure that there is equal time given to each candidate. And the best part? There is no campaigning or interviews or tv time allowed for 36 hours before the voting starts.

  5. Mitch!

    Even with all those protestors it still looks lovely there.

    I'd LOVE to visit Spain one day.

    You are so very lucky.

    -Dean

  6. The "party" never stops there, does it!
    If I were you, I'd send them all to bed without a snack. Wait, I mean, if you were me. I'm sure that makes sense somehow!
    m.

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