Unicorns and Fire-Breathing Dragons

I read last week that Fuengirola issued new licenses to 15 street performers. The following day, a fire-juggling two-some appeared on the Paseo. They must be licensed because they’re allowed to perform throughout the evening inches away from all the restaurants; amid the trees, awnings, and pedestrians. I took some photos during our last two visits to Sandpiper Restaurant. One guy is the juggler/acrobat and the other is clearly there to ensure safety — he’s also the muscle for one segment, as you’ll see in the second photo.

The Unicorn
I think I’m starting to forget my English, which is tragic since my Spanish doesn’t fill the gap. When the juggler pulled out this one-wheeled thingamabob, I told San Geraldo, “Look, he’s got a unicorn… Wait… That’s not right. Unicycle.” At least I can still tell when it’s not right.

PLAYING WITH FIRE… ON A UNICORN, THURSDAY NIGHT.
FRIDAY NIGHT. THE UNICORN (I THINK IT’S THE SAME ONE) AS SEEN FROM OUR TERRACE.

The Dragons
Speaking of fire (and extinct creatures), some of the sand sculptors along the beach have been having a good time creating dragons. A number actually breathe fire. Others don’t need to.

FIRE-BREATHING DRAGON.
NO FIRE, BUT I WOULDN’T MESS WITH HIM.

Author: Moving with Mitchell

From Brooklyn, New York; to North Massapequa; back to Brooklyn; Brockport, New York; back to Brooklyn... To Boston, Massachusetts, where I met Jerry... To Marina del Rey, California; Washington, DC; New Haven and Guilford, Connecticut; San Diego, San Francisco, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Irvine, California; Sevilla, Spain. And Fuengirola, Málaga..

11 thoughts on “Unicorns and Fire-Breathing Dragons”

  1. I burst out laughing when I read about the unicorns because I do this sort of shit all the TIME. I am always sure that I am one step away from Alzheimers. I was once talking to my sister about my daughter's 8th grade graduation and I asked her when she planned on getting to the carnival and if I should save a seat for her. She looked at me oddly and said, "Carnival?" I said yes. She frowned. Bing cut in and said, "I think she means AUDITORIUM, Patrice."

    1. Maria:
      I agree with Judeet. That IS a classic. There was a very clever poem written for me for my 40th birthday. One of the lines was "Who translates Jerry when others despair to?" Just change that to Maria and think of Bing. (I'm usually NOT the one to get my words mixed.)

      Anyway, I'd much rather go to a carnival than an auditorium.

    1. Stephen:
      At first I thought, "Well, it's not Sevilla, but it's beautiful and relaxing." Now I realize there's plenty to keep me interested. It IS like living in Disneyland… but a bit more eclectic!

  2. Total immersion! The only way to learn another language, I say. Good that you are feeling at home enough to start getting confused about any English that comes by you, Mitch! Comprenez? lol
    The 'carnival' atmosphere must be lovely on warm breezy summer nights…..ah-h-h.
    Can't get over those sculptures!

    1. Judeet:
      Even scarier, San Geraldo, who Spanish is not nearly as "brilliant" as mine is also forgetting English words. He was at the market looking for albahaca and, when asked by the vendor what the English word for it was (basil), he couldn't remember

    1. Kristi:
      I don't know about exciting, but it's not bad! As for English-speaking friends, here in Fuengirola, we use English a lot more often than we did in Sevilla. We're just addle-headed!

Share your thoughts and experiences. It's always nice to know I'm not alone.