Still Life With Jesús And One Naked Fútbol Player

During Judyshannonstreetwhat’s visit (click here if you don’t know what I’m talking about), she and I went to the Picasso Museum in Málaga (the city of Pablo Picasso’s birth). It was my first time at the museum and I loved it. Judy(etc.) had not been a big fan of Picasso, but she, too, loved the museum and left with a better appreciation of his talent and genius.

THE 16TH-CENTURY PALACIO BUENAVISTA IS NOW HOME TO THE MUSEO PICASSO.
A FRONT DOOR.
(BENEATH THE PALACIO ARE PHOENICIAN, ROMAN, AND MOORISH RUINS.)
ANCIENT PHOENICIAN WALL BELOW THE MUSEUM (8TH CENTURY B.C.)
PHOTO COURTESY MUSEO PICASSO MÁLAGA.

Judy(etc.) had a special fondness for a painting, “Naturaleza muerta con cráneo y tres erizos” (“Still life with skull and three sea urchins”), probably more for the idea and title than for any other reason. Picasso did quite a number of still lifes with skulls with or without sea urchins (and still lifes with sea urchins with or without skulls).

“STILL LIFE WITH SKULL AND THREE SEA URCHINS,” 1947.
FROM THE COLLECTION OF MUSEO PICASSO MÁLAGA.

When we got off the train in Málaga, we stopped in a cafe for a quick drink (really to use the “services”). I had a special fondness for the still life set up in the café.  I call it “Naturaleza muerta con Jesús y un jugador de fútbol desnudo,” (“Still life with Jesus and one naked football player”). I asked the bartender who the fútbol player was (or players… the guy in the middle didn’t look the same). She had no idea. Maybe you can help?

“STILL LIFE WITH JESÚS AND ONE NAKED FOOTBALL PLAYER,” DATE UNKNOWN”
FROM THE COLLECTION OF BAR RESTAURANTE ARCOS MÁLAGA.

Photography is not permitted inside the exhibit areas of the Picasso Museum, so, you’ll have to check out the museum for yourselves to see more (http://museopicassomalaga.org, if you can’t get to Málaga). I think they did a brilliant job of converting (and preserving) the former private palace (and some surrounding buildings) into a stunning exhibit space. It’s believed that the 16th-century palace was built over the remains of a Nasrid Palace (the Nasrid Dynasty ruled Málaga and other cities of Southern Spain from 1232–1492). An original tower still stands and was incorporated into the 16th-century palace.

THE PALACE/MUSEUM’S CENTRAL COURTYARD.
HEADING UPSTAIRS TO MORE EXHIBIT SPACE.
BEAUTIFULLY RESTORED CARVED CEILINGS.

THE ENTIRE COURTYARD IS SHADED BY A ROMAN-STYLE AWNING.
HEADING BACK DOWN.
GARDEN AND CAFE CAN BE GLIMPSED THROUGH THE WINDOWS.
HEADING BACK OUTSIDE.
THE NASRID DYNASTY TOWER.

Judyshannonstreetwhat’s Aha Moment
After the museum, Judy(etc.) and I stopped at a shop with gifts that were much nicer than the standard souvenir shop fare. Judy bought three sets of fun and unusual salt and pepper shakers.

The salesperson was a charming young guy named Leo (sorry, no photo). Judy had been practicing her Spanish throughout her visit and was doing amazingly well.

Leo asked Judy, “¿De dónde es usted?” [Where are you from?]

I could see the wheels spinning in Judy’s head as she repeated aloud, dragging out the last two words: “…és usted.” Suddenly, she smiled, poked her finger in the air as if to say, “Eureka!”

“¡Bien, gracias!” was her joy-filled response. [Fine, thank you!]

I’m not sure. I think Judy might have immediately commanded, “Do not put that in your blog!”

But, as I just mentioned, I’m not sure.

Author: Moving with Mitchell

From Brooklyn, New York; to North Massapequa; back to Brooklyn; Brockport, New York; back to Brooklyn... To Boston, Massachusetts, where I met Jerry... To Marina del Rey, California; Washington, DC; New Haven and Guilford, Connecticut; San Diego, San Francisco, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Irvine, California; Sevilla, Spain. And Fuengirola, Málaga..

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