The Long and Dusty Road to Rocío

After walking, driving, and/or riding for most of four days and 78 km (47 miles), Lola, Albert and Alex, Lola’s son Javier, Lola’s brother, and the assorted other pilgrims arrived safely in Rocío Saturday afternoon, partied their hearts out Saturday night, and then began to pay their respects Sunday to the Virgin of Rocío. I think the pilgrims will all depart Rocío Tuesday or Wednesday. Since I am no pilgrim, Lola, Albert, and Javier very kindly have taken photos and shared them along the way. I’m glad I didn’t make that long, dusty trek; tapas with las guapas Friday night was so much more relaxing (and clean). But, from the photos, it would be an amazing event to witness. And the music and dancing look joyous. Maybe San Geraldo and I should take Flamenco lessons.

THE PILGRIMS FROM TRIANA WITH THE PASO AND WAGONS IN THE BACKGROUND.

IT BECOMES A VERY DUSTY AND DIRTY TREK AS THEY GET CLOSER TO ROCÍO.

REACHING ROCÍO SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

SATURDAY NIGHT.

ALWAYS SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE.

MAY EVERYONE STILL BE SINGING AND DANCING NEXT YEAR!

THE VIRGIN OF ROCÍO.

Author: Moving with Mitchell

From Brooklyn, New York; to North Massapequa; back to Brooklyn; Brockport, New York; back to Brooklyn... To Boston, Massachusetts, where I met Jerry... To Marina del Rey, California; Washington, DC; New Haven and Guilford, Connecticut; San Diego, San Francisco, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Irvine, California; Sevilla, Spain. And Fuengirola, Málaga..

12 thoughts on “The Long and Dusty Road to Rocío”

  1. Hello Mitch:
    It is indeed rather wonderful that, even in the present, there are those people prepared to make the kind of pilgrimage which your words and pictures describe in this post. And it all looks exceedingly colourful – and rather jolly!!

    1. J&L:
      I hope all their prayers are answered and I hope they have the money and time to make the pilgrimage next year. Andalusians know how to celebrate and make everything colorful.

  2. The religious festivals of the Spanish are a far cry from those in Minnesota–no doubt due to the influence of all those Scandinavian and German immigrants!

  3. My goodness me, the Spainers are a dedicated lot! In the Church of England I believe that they occasionally forego a second cup of tea once in a while during Lent, and consider that sufficient atonement/punishent/whatever …

    1. The Owl Wood:
      Yes, but while suffering that long and dusty pilgrimage, they don't deprive themselves of excellent refreshments (food and drink) all along the way. They know how to live… and sacrifice. I don't know what it's like. I have never had anything to atone for and I live with a saint.

  4. I am beginning to believe that the people of Spain are strong and determined folk! The 'challenges' in their culture are so deep rooted, no wonder they are a strong people!

  5. What I like best is the colour – so bright and bold. I think the worship of the Divine should always be full of light and colour.

    1. Sophie/Ron:
      Quite often many of the performers at these events are professionals. Albert told me none of these were but they were all exceptional. The lady in pink does look like a hoot!

Share your thoughts and experiences. It's always nice to know I'm not alone.