A Man’s Home Is His Castle

THE MARQUIS

A man’s home may very well be his castle, especially if that home is hundreds of years old and located in Antequera.

After we parked our rental car Friday in the center of town, we headed up a random street to find the tourist office. Every street we walked in Antequera was a revelation. The one we happened to choose, Calle Lucena, was lined with former private palaces, most built in the 18th century and most beautifully restored and maintained.

The first four photos were taken (on Calle Lucena) of the palace of Francisco Arias Castillo Fajardo y Muñoz (Second Marquis of Villadarias). The Marquis built the palace in 1711 and lived there until his death in 1716. It’s said to be the best Baroque building of its kind in Antequera. (Click any of the images to see the humble homes in a bit more grandeur.)

PALACE OF THE MARQUIS OF VILLADARIAS.
THE FRONT DOORS.
(NOTE THE CUTOUTS FOR THE CARRIAGE WHEELS.)
THE VESTIBULE.
A PEAK AT THE INNER COURTYARD THROUGH A 19TH-CENTURY GATE.

Following are shots of other “houses” around town. No doubt some of these homes were women’s castles, too. The houses and palaces can look austere at times from the street. Most open into large inner courtyards filled with light, gardens, and fountains.

BACK ON CALLE LUCENA.
(THE MARQUIS’ HOUSE IS SECOND ON THE LEFT.)

Author: Moving with Mitchell

From Brooklyn, New York; to North Massapequa; back to Brooklyn; Brockport, New York; back to Brooklyn... To Boston, Massachusetts, where I met Jerry... To Marina del Rey, California; Washington, DC; New Haven and Guilford, Connecticut; San Diego, San Francisco, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Irvine, California; Sevilla, Spain. And Fuengirola, Málaga..

8 thoughts on “A Man’s Home Is His Castle”

    1. Jim:
      Some are private residences. Many have been updated and turned into apartments (either huge, one or two per floor; or multiple units). I don't know if the "marquis' house" is a private residence or used for events or a museum. I had no idea what I was taking pictures of. Looked it up when I got home and was amazed. The architecture is very different from Sevilla's, but when the private palaces were common there, too. When we first arrived in Sevilla, we almost took an apartment in a former private palace. That one wasn't as large as the marquis', there was also an inner courtyard, and the 4-floor building had been redeisgned into 4 apartments per floor.

  1. Great architecture!!
    Love the idea of an inner courtyard,
    more private than our front lawns and backyards,
    staring at the neighbors, and vice versa…
    :D~
    HUGZ

    1. TICKLEBEAR:
      When we lived in Sevilla, I was told that the rule was, if the doors are open to the entryway, you're welcome to step inside and take a peak through the gates. The inner courtyards were always a surprise. (I don't know if the rule was true, but I never got in any trouble.)

Share your thoughts and experiences. It's always nice to know I'm not alone.