Wealthy Viola, a hotel in Palm Springs, and no regrets / Viola rica, un hotel en Palm Springs y sin remordimientos

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.
WEALTHY VIOLA FURBISH LOWELL

I wrote briefly in an earlier post about our short-lived hotel in Palm Springs, one of several adventures we’ve had over the years.  We called our place Viola’s Resort in honor of Jerry’s great-great-grandmother.  Her real name was Wealthy Viola Furbish Lowell, but we decided to stick with Viola (which is what she went by).  Besides, “Wealthy’s Resort” would have been a bit presumptuous for first-time hoteliers and, as it turned out in our case, it also would have been ludicrous.

HOW IT BEGAN

One afternoon in early 2000, standing in the Berkeley BART station, while heading home from our jobs at UC Berkeley — Jerry as university librarian and I as director of University Communications — I said, “I just can’t do this anymore.”

I was completely burnt out.  My job was destroying any mental stability I might have had.  Jerry wasn’t much happier.  His mother had died unexpectedly just a few month’s earlier.  He was tremendously frustrated with Berkeley’s bureaucracy, and he was taking more and more time off.  The cook at our favorite eatery, Tyger’s, in our neighborhood of Glen Park, saw Jerry there so often that he finally walked out of the kitchen and asked him, “Do you actually work for a living?”  Obviously, Jerry’s heart wasn’t in his work.  I didn’t think I could survive mine.

In response to my whine, Jerry, the reorganization expert, suggested we list our options.

THE OPTIONS:
1)  Mitchell finds a corporate job in San Francisco;
2)  Mitchell and Jerry both find corporate jobs in San Francisco;
3)  Mitchell and Jerry quit their jobs, sell the house in San Francisco, move to Palm Springs, and get jobs at Burger King;
4)  Mitchell and Jerry quit their jobs, sell the house in San Francisco, and open a hotel (a fantasy we’d had for years); and
5)  Mitchell and Jerry win the lottery.

I had been tentatively exploring corporate opportunities, but that didn’t excite me and I was so desperate to get out of my current situation that I had pretty much blown an opportunity a few months earlier — and, in my desperation, I couldn’t trust that I wouldn’t just jump into anything that came along (out of the frying pan into the fire); actually, the opportunity I had blown would have been awful, but I couldn’t see that at the time.  Jerry had gone the corporate route early in his career and wasn’t enamored with it.  Winning the lottery was clearly the best outcome, but we couldn’t do much planning for that.  Burger King didn’t sound ideal, but had moved up in the rankings. We were pretty sure option #4, the hotel, was where we were headed.  So Jerry then suggested we list out parameters to determine what was required and what didn’t matter to us (i.e., what could make any decision the right decision or the wrong decision).

UNDER RENOVATION.  PLENTY OF SEATING.  OUT WITH THE OLD.
BAJO RENOVACIÓN. MUCHOS ASIENTOS. AFUERA CON LO VIEJO.

We decided that if we wanted financial security, we could just keep things the way they were.  We also (fortuitously) decided that if things didn’t work out with a hotel, the worst-case scenario was that we’d go broke and have to start over — and we agreed that was something we could deal with.

THE FRONT GATE AT CHRISTMAS.
LA PUERTA PRINCIPAL EN LA NAVIDAD.

Without much discussion, we agreed that Palm Springs, California, was definitely where our hotel should be.  We loved it there.  We loved the desert.  Property was affordable.  And it was a very popular destination.  The fact that it was a popular destination for gay people, as well, had a lot to do with our choice.  We did, however, agree that we did not what to open a place for gay men exclusively.  Our friendships are diverse and, although we loved staying at men’s resorts in Palm Springs and not feeling like a minority for once (the gay part, not the men part), we were very disappointed one Thanksgiving when we decided to go to Palm Springs with two friends (women) and discovered they were not allowed to stay at (or even come on the premises of) the place we loved.  For that trip, we finally found a gay-owned place that grudgingly welcomed women, but the entire process was disappointing to say the least.

READY FOR CHRISTMAS 2001.

So, for our own place, we decided we would open a hotel for gays and lesbians, their families, and their friends.  An LGBT-friendly, children-friendly, family friendly, diversity friendly, bed & breakfast–style hotel.  We did our research and learned we would be the first in the country.  The market was not huge, but the trend in “non-traditional family” business was encouraging.  And, most importantly, it would make us feel good.

OUR CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST: SAFE TO EAT.  I DIDN’T COOK ANYTHING.
NUESTRO DESAYUNO CONTINENTAL: SEGURO PARA COMER. YO NO COCINÉ NADA.

We found a two-story ’50s-era motel/apartment complex, and were landlords for a few months before moving everyone out and renovating the property.  The property was right on Palm Canyon Drive, which we thought was a good thing for a family inn — the kids could make all the noise they wanted, restaurants were all around, and we would be easy to find.  We planted only child-friendly gardens (i.e., no cactus with spines, no toxic plants), with the most unusual plants we could find, including chocolate daisies (berlandiera lyrata).  These flowers look like scraggly daisies and smell like chocolate.

CHOCOLATE DAISIES.  FOR THE CHOCOHOLIC WHO HAS EVERYTHING.
MARGARITAS DE CHOCOLATE. PARA EL CHOCOHÓLICO QUE LO TIENE TODO.

We opened with a bang.  We were fully booked the first couple of weekends, first with a family pride board’s annual event, then with lots of individual families.  One such family comprised two women and their brand-new baby daughter (one month old) along with the 92-year-old grandmother of one of the women. We were featured in the premiere issue of “And Baby,” a magazine said to be “redefining modern parenting.” Sadly, “And Baby” didn’t survive the recession any better than Viola’s Resort.

A PAGE FROM THE PREMIERE ISSUE OF “AND BABY” MAGAZINE.
UNA PÁGINA DEL NÚMERO DE ESTRENO DE LA REVISTA “Y BEBÉ”.

We took pride in what we had accomplished.  But we then quickly discovered that the market for our type of hotel was even smaller than we had anticipated.  No surprise were the single gay people who really didn’t want to be surrounded by a bunch of kids.  We did, however, have many return guests.  Couples and singles without children who loved to be around families; some wanted families of their own someday.  Men with children who loved the idea of being in such an accepting and inclusive environment.  Women with children who felt the same.

MORE POTS AND MORE PLANTINGS WERE ADDED OVER THE NEXT YEAR.
SE AÑADIERON MÁS MACETAS Y MÁS PLANTAS DURANTE EL PRÓXIMO AÑO.

We had our share of “aha” moments.  We discovered that we really weren’t cut out for the B&B business.  We enjoy our free time way too much and when you own a B&B, you don’t get any free time.  It’s a 24/7 career.  Also, we were reminded again that male chauvinism is not just a straight male trait.  For example, we were sad to find that a lot of men with children would only visit if they knew other men with children would be there; some didn’t even want to be there with two-mom families.  Some other unkind things were said at times, but we reassured ourselves that, in addition to a loyal two-mom family clientele, we also had plenty of unbelievably wonderful two-dad families to make up for those less enlightened.  But, timing is a big part of success.  And our timing was dismal.  Seven months after we opened was 9/11/01.  Tourism in Palm Springs dropped 43 percent.  We had only a very tiny percentage of that number to begin with; we were already lagging behind our projections.  With the huge drop in business all over town and all over the country, we just couldn’t carry things.  We converted to a gay men’s hotel to bring in just a little extra cash while we tried to sell (which turned out to be an impossibility in those difficult financial times).  We still hosted some family weekends, but it wasn’t the same.  Even during those trying times, we had some wonderful — and enlightened — male guests.  But having a resort that excluded others just wasn’t our style.

THE SUBARU OUT FRONT WAS A LEMON.  SO, WE PLANTED ORANGES AROUND BACK.
EL SUBARU AL FRENTE ERA UN LIMÓN. ASÍ QUE PLANTAMOS NARANJAS EN LA PARTE POSTERIOR.

During the brief life of Viola’s Resort, we met some exceptional people. We also had some high-maintenance visitors — like the billionaire’s daughter who actually snapped her fingers when she wanted something.  She traveled with her two children and her personal assistant (and her personal assistant’s young daughter). Given her behavior, I was immediately surprised when I saw that she didn’t find it beneath her to change her own children’s diapers until I discovered that she left the soiled ones wherever she happened to be when she removed them — in the middle of the floor in her bedroom or living room, on the patio, on the stairs.  By her third visit, I had gotten to know her well enough to realize she was probably well-meaning but just completely oblivious.

IF YOU HAVE TO GO BROKE, THIS IS THE WAY TO DO IT.
SI TIENES QUE IR A LA QUIEBRA, ESTA ES LA MANERA DE HACERLO.

There was one little girl, around 2-1/2, who was insistent on petting the koi fish.  Her father finally walked over and said, “Honey, if you pet the fish, he’ll throw up.”  She immediately pulled her hand out of the water and walked away.  He saw my puzzled expression and said, “She hates the idea of throwing up and right now it’s the only thing I have to keep her in check.”  He then added, “Yeah, I’m going to be paying for years of therapy.”

“IF YOU PET THE FISH, HE’LL THROW UP.”
“SI ACARITAS AL PEZ, VOMITARÁ”.

So, we lost our shirts.  We added significantly to our stress levels.  But we discovered we could live in only three rooms, work together 24 hours a day, go broke together, and love each other even more after all was all said and done.

Besides, as the saying goes:
Regrets for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsoloble.

Escribí brevemente en una publicación anterior sobre nuestro hotel de corta duración en Palm Springs, una de varias aventuras que hemos tenido a lo largo de los años. Llamamos a nuestro lugar Viola’s Resort en honor a la tatarabuela de Jerry. Su verdadero nombre era Wealthy Viola Furbish Lowell, pero decidimos quedarnos con Viola (que es por lo que ella pasó). Además, “Wealthy’s Resort” habría sido un poco presuntuoso para los hoteleros primerizos y, como resultó en nuestro caso, también habría sido ridículo.

CÓMO COMENZÓ
Una tarde a principios de 2000, parado en la estación BART de Berkeley, mientras regresaba a casa desde nuestros trabajos en UC Berkeley (Jerry como bibliotecario universitario y yo como director de Comunicaciones Universitarias), dije: “Ya no puedo hacer esto”.

Estaba completamente quemado. Mi trabajo estaba destruyendo cualquier estabilidad mental que pudiera haber tenido. Jerry no estaba mucho más feliz. Su madre había muerto inesperadamente unos pocos meses antes. Estaba tremendamente frustrado con la burocracia de Berkeley y cada vez se tomaba más tiempo libre. El cocinero de nuestro restaurante favorito, Tyger’s, en nuestro vecindario de Glen Park, vio a Jerry allí con tanta frecuencia que finalmente salió de la cocina y le preguntó: “¿Realmente trabajas para ganarte la vida?” Obviamente, el corazón de Jerry no estaba en su trabajo. No pensé que podría sobrevivir a la mía.

En respuesta a mi queja, Jerry, el experto en reorganización, sugirió que enumeráramos nuestras opciones.

LAS OPCIONES:
1) Mitchell encuentra un trabajo corporativo en San Francisco;
2) Mitchell y Jerry encuentran trabajos corporativos en San Francisco;
3)  Mitchell y Jerry renunciaron a sus trabajos, vendieron la casa en San Francisco, se mudaron a Palm Springs y consiguieron trabajos en Burger King;
4) Mitchell y Jerry renunciaron a sus trabajos, vendieron la casa en San Francisco y abrieron un hotel (una fantasía que habíamos tenido durante años); y
5) Mitchell y Jerry ganan la lotería.

Estuve tentativamente explorando oportunidades corporativas, pero eso no me entusiasmó y estaba tan desesperado por salir de mi situación actual que casi había desperdiciado una oportunidad unos meses antes y, en mi desesperación, no pude confiar en que no me tiraría a nada de lo que se me presente (de la sartén al fuego); en realidad, la oportunidad que había desperdiciado habría sido horrible, pero no pude ver eso en ese momento. Jerry había tomado la ruta corporativa al principio de su carrera y no estaba enamorado de ella. Ganar la lotería fue claramente el mejor resultado, pero no pudimos hacer mucha planificación para eso. Burger King no sonaba ideal, pero había subido en la clasificación. Estábamos bastante seguros de que la opción #4, el hotel, era a donde nos dirigíamos. Entonces, Jerry sugirió que enumeráramos los parámetros para determinar qué se requería y qué no nos importaba (es decir, qué podría hacer que cualquier decisión fuera la decisión correcta o la decisión incorrecta).

Decidimos que si queríamos seguridad financiera, podíamos mantener las cosas como estaban. También (fortuitamente) decidimos que si las cosas no funcionaban con un hotel, el peor de los casos era que quebraríamos y tendríamos que empezar de nuevo, y acordamos que era algo con lo que podíamos lidiar.

Sin mucha discusión, acordamos que Palm Springs, California, era definitivamente el lugar donde debería estar nuestro hotel. Nos encantó allí. Nos encantó el desierto. La propiedad era asequible. Y era un destino muy popular. El hecho de que también fuera un destino popular para los homosexuales tuvo mucho que ver con nuestra elección. Sin embargo, acordamos que no queríamos abrir un lugar exclusivamente para hombres homosexuales. Nuestras amistades son diversas y, aunque nos encantaba hospedarnos en resorts para hombres en Palm Springs y no sentirnos como una minoría por una vez (la parte gay, no la parte de los hombres), nos decepcionó mucho un Día de Acción de Gracias cuando decidimos ir a Palm Springs con dos amigas (mujeres) y descubrimos que no se les permitía quedarse (o incluso entrar) en el lugar que amábamos. Para ese viaje, finalmente encontramos un lugar propiedad de homosexuales que a regañadientes daba la bienvenida a las mujeres, pero todo el proceso fue decepcionante por decir lo menos.

Entonces, para nuestro propio lugar, decidimos abrir un hotel para gays y lesbianas, sus familias y sus amigos. Un hotel estilo bed & breakfast, amigable con los LGBT, amigable con los niños, familiar, amigable con la diversidad. Hicimos nuestra investigación y aprendimos que seríamos los primeros en el país. El mercado no era enorme, pero la tendencia en los negocios “familiares no tradicionales” era alentadora. Y, lo más importante, nos haría sentir bien.

Encontramos un motel/complejo de apartamentos de dos pisos de la década de 1950, y fuimos propietarios durante unos meses antes de mudarnos a todos y renovar la propiedad. La propiedad estaba justo en Palm Canyon Drive, lo que pensamos que era algo bueno para una posada familiar: los niños podían hacer todo el ruido que quisieran, había restaurantes por todas partes y sería fácil encontrarnos. Plantamos solo jardines aptos para niños (es decir, sin cactus con espinas, sin plantas tóxicas), con las plantas más inusuales que pudimos encontrar, incluidas las margaritas de chocolate (berlandiera lyrata). Estas flores parecen margaritas desaliñadas y huelen a chocolate.

Abrimos con fuerza. Estábamos completos los primeros fines de semana, primero con un evento anual de la junta del orgullo familiar, luego con muchas familias individuales. Una de esas familias estaba compuesta por dos mujeres y su nueva hija (de un mes) junto con la abuela de 92 años de una de las mujeres. Aparecimos en la primera edición de “And Baby”, una revista que se dice que está “redefiniendo la paternidad moderna”. Lamentablemente, “And Baby” no sobrevivió a la recesión mejor que Viola’s Resort.

Estábamos orgullosos de lo que habíamos logrado. Pero pronto descubrimos que el mercado para nuestro tipo de hotel era aún más pequeño de lo que habíamos previsto. No fue una sorpresa que los homosexuales solteros no quisieran estar rodeados de un montón de niños. Sin embargo, tuvimos muchos huéspedes que regresaban. Parejas y solteros sin hijos a los que les encantaba estar rodeados de familias; algunos querían familias propias algún día. Hombres con hijos a los que les encantaba la idea de estar en un entorno tan acogedor e inclusivo. Mujeres con hijos que sentían lo mismo.

Tuvimos nuestra parte de momentos “ajá”. Descubrimos que realmente no estábamos hechos para el negocio de B&B. Disfrutamos demasiado de nuestro tiempo libre y cuando tienes un B&B, no tienes tiempo libre. Es una carrera 24/7. Además, se nos recordó nuevamente que el chovinismo masculino no es solo un rasgo masculino heterosexual. Por ejemplo, nos entristeció descubrir que muchos hombres con niños solo visitaban si sabían que otros hombres con niños estarían allí; algunos ni siquiera querían estar allí con familias de dos madres. A veces se decían otras cosas poco amables, pero nos aseguramos de que, además de una clientela familiar leal de dos madres, también teníamos muchas familias increíblemente maravillosas de dos padres para compensar a los menos ilustrados. Pero, el tiempo es una gran parte del éxito. Y nuestro momento fue pésimo. Siete meses después de que abrimos fue el 11/09/01. El turismo en Palm Springs cayó un 43 por ciento. Para empezar, solo teníamos un porcentaje muy pequeño de ese número; ya estábamos rezagados con respecto a nuestras proyecciones. Con la enorme caída de los negocios en toda la ciudad y en todo el país, simplemente no podíamos llevar las cosas. Nos convertimos en un hotel para hombres homosexuales para obtener un poco de dinero extra mientras tratábamos de vender (lo que resultó ser imposible en esos tiempos financieros difíciles). Seguíamos siendo anfitriones de algunos fines de semana familiares, pero no era lo mismo. Incluso durante esos tiempos difíciles, tuvimos algunos invitados masculinos maravillosos e ilustrados. Pero tener un resort que excluyera a otros no era nuestro estilo.

Durante la breve vida de Viola’s Resort, conocimos a algunas personas excepcionales. También tuvimos algunos visitantes de alto mantenimiento, como la hija del multimillonario que en realidad chasqueaba los dedos cuando quería algo. Viajó con sus dos hijos y su asistente personal (y la hija pequeña de su asistente personal). Dado su comportamiento, me sorprendió de inmediato cuando vi que no le parecía indigno cambiar los pañales de sus propios hijos hasta que descubrí que dejaba los sucios dondequiera que estuviera cuando se los quitaba, en medio de la piso en su dormitorio o sala, en el patio, en las escaleras. Para su tercera visita, la conocía lo suficientemente bien como para darme cuenta de que probablemente tenía buenas intenciones, pero simplemente no se daba cuenta.

Había una niña, de alrededor de dos años y medio, que insistía en acariciar a los peces koi. Su padre finalmente se acercó y dijo: “Cariño, si acaricias al pez, vomitará”. Inmediatamente sacó su mano del agua y se alejó. Vio mi expresión desconcertada y dijo: “Odia la idea de vomitar y ahora mismo es lo único que tengo para mantenerla bajo control”. Luego agregó: “Sí, voy a pagar por años de terapia”.

Entonces, perdimos nuestras camisas. Aumentamos significativamente nuestros niveles de estrés. Pero descubrimos que podíamos vivir en solo tres habitaciones, trabajar juntos las 24 horas del día, arruinarnos juntos y amarnos aún más después de todo lo dicho y hecho.

Además, como dice el refrán:
Los arrepentimientos por las cosas que hicimos pueden atenuarse con el tiempo; es el arrepentimiento por las cosas que no hicimos lo que es inconsolable.

Author: Moving with Mitchell

From Brooklyn, New York; to North Massapequa; back to Brooklyn; Brockport, New York; back to Brooklyn... To Boston, Massachusetts, where I met Jerry... To Marina del Rey, California; Washington, DC; New Haven and Guilford, Connecticut; San Diego, San Francisco, Palm Springs, and Santa Barbara, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Irvine, California; Sevilla, Spain. And Fuengirola, Málaga..

4 thoughts on “Wealthy Viola, a hotel in Palm Springs, and no regrets / Viola rica, un hotel en Palm Springs y sin remordimientos”

  1. Very interesting story. You guys are amazing. By the way, Ken and I lived in Glen Park between 1995 and 2003, just prior to selling our house and moving to France. And I'm a Berkeley grad. What a small world.

  2. Hey, we went online looking for Viola's and are sad to hear it's no more. We enjoyed our one stay with you in high summer (we can't remember how long ago it was). One night we were the only guests, period, but you were gracious as ever and put out a breakfast spread as if there were 100 guests.

    Enjoy Seville, but if you ever open up another B&B (I know– unlikely given your experience, but hey, never say never…), let us know! (daviskovensky AT gmail DOT com)

Please share your thoughts...

%d bloggers like this: