What I Will Never Be / Lo Que Nunca Seré

La versión español está después de la primera foto.

I HAVE DECIDED to never pursue a career in knife sharpening. Just washing dishes puts me in enough danger.

I stabbed the tip of my finger with a fork last night. I had a moment of panic when I saw a lot of blood. ‘What did I hit?’ I wondered.

By the time I cleaned and wrapped my finger in two small Band-Aids, the bleeding had already stopped. But when I returned to the kitchen, there were drops of blood everywhere. So, that wasn’t my imagination.

The first time I saw a knife sharpener plying his trade on the streets was when we moved to Sevilla in 2011. Local tradesmen make the rounds of the old neighborhoods with their equipment attached to bicycles and motos. They make their presence known with the use of a repetitive tune played on a pan flute. Here in Fuengirola, they carry their tools in cars and vans, as well. Next time one is in the neighborhood, I’ll probably take our knives down.

Our forks are already sharp enough.


HE DECIDIDO NUNCA seguir una carrera como afilador de cuchillos. Solo lavar los platos me pone en suficiente peligro. Anoche apuñalé la punta de mi dedo con un tenedor. Tuve un momento de pánico cuando vi mucho sangre ‘¿Qué golpeé?’ me preguntaba.

Cuando lo limpié y lo envolví en dos tiritas, el sangrado ya se había detenido. Pero cuando volví a la cocina, había gotas de sangre por todas partes. Entonces, esa no era mi imaginación.

La primera vez que vi a un afilador de cuchillos trabajando en las calles fue cuando nos mudamos a Sevilla en 2011. Los comerciantes locales recorren los viejos barrios con sus equipos conectados a bicicletas y motos. Hacen su presencia con el uso de una melodía repetitiva tocada en una flauta de pan. Aquí en Fuengirola, también llevan sus herramientas en automóviles y camionetas. La próxima vez que uno esté en el vecindario, probablemente baje los cuchillos.

Nuestros tenedores ya son lo suficientemente afilados.

SEVILLA, 2011.
FUENGIROLA, 2017.

LAST WEEK / LA SEMANA PASADA. 

WATCH THOSE FINGERS!
¡CUIDADO CON ESOS DEDOS!

How Lovely Are Thy Branches / Qué Verdes Son

OVER THE YEARS, a few of our Christmas trees. (Only missing 29 trees.)

A LO LARGO de los años, algunos de nuestros árboles de Navidad. (Solo faltan 29 árboles.)

MARINA DEL REY, CALIFORNIA. 1982.
GEORGETOWN, WASHINGTON, DC. 1984.
NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, 1986. A 14-FOOT TREE.
347 ORNAMENTS; 750 WHITE LIGHTS; 72 CANDY CANES; AND A 30-FOOT POPCORN, CRANBERRY, AND ZITI GARLAND.
NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, 1986. UN ÁRBOL DE 4 METROS.
347 ADORNOS; 750 LUCES BLANCAS; 72 BASTONES DE CARAMELO; Y UNA GUIRNALDA DE 9 METROS DE PALOMITAS, ARÁNDANOS, Y ZITI.
HOW? A STEPLADDER, THREE GIFT WRAP TUBES TAPED TOGETHER, A WIRE CLOTHES HANGER — AND A LOT OF TALENT.
HOW? UNA ESCALERA, TRES TUBOS DE CARTÓN PEGADOS CON CINTA ADHESIVA, UN GANCHO DE ALAMBRE — Y MUCHO TALENTO.
GUILFORD, CONNECTICUT, 1992. OUR FRESHLY CUT TREE.
GUILFORD, CONNECTICUT, 1992. NUESTRO ÁRBOL RECIÉN CORTADO.
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 1998.
OUR HOTEL, VIOLA’S RESORT, PALM SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA. 2001.
NUESTRO HOTEL, VIOLA’S RESORT, PALM SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA, 2001. 
SEVILLE, SPAIN, 2011.
SEVILLA, ESPAÑA, 2011.

How Lovely Are Thy Branches / Qué Verdes Son

OVER THE YEARS, a few of our Christmas trees. (Only missing 29 trees.)

A LO LARGO de los años, algunos de nuestros árboles de Navidad. (Solo faltan 29 árboles.)

MARINA DEL REY, CALIFORNIA. 1982.
GEORGETOWN, WASHINGTON, DC. 1984.
NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, 1986. A 14-FOOT TREE.
347 ORNAMENTS; 750 WHITE LIGHTS; 72 CANDY CANES; AND A 30-FOOT POPCORN, CRANBERRY, AND ZITI GARLAND.
NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, 1986. UN ÁRBOL DE 4 METROS.
347 ADORNOS; 750 LUCES BLANCAS; 72 BASTONES DE CARAMELO; Y UNA GUIRNALDA DE 9 METROS DE PALOMITAS, ARÁNDANOS, Y ZITI.
HOW? A STEPLADDER, THREE GIFT WRAP TUBES TAPED TOGETHER, A WIRE CLOTHES HANGER — AND A LOT OF TALENT.
HOW? UNA ESCALERA, TRES TUBOS DE CARTÓN PEGADOS CON CINTA ADHESIVA, UN GANCHO DE ALAMBRE — Y MUCHO TALENTO.
GUILFORD, CONNECTICUT, 1992. OUR FRESHLY CUT TREE.
GUILFORD, CONNECTICUT, 1992. NUESTRO ÁRBOL RECIÉN CORTADO.
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 1998.
OUR HOTEL, VIOLA’S RESORT, PALM SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA. 2001.
NUESTRO HOTEL, VIOLA’S RESORT, PALM SPRINGS, CALIFORNIA, 2001. 
SEVILLE, SPAIN, 2011.
SEVILLA, ESPAÑA, 2011.

They Can’t Get It Up / No Pueden Levantarlo

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

EVERY YEAR AT the end of July or the beginning of August, the City of Sevilla brings a hot-air balloon to our neighborhood beach, Los Boliches, in Fuengirola. It’s a bit of publicity for Sevilla. They give people free rides while tethered — the balloon, not the people.

Two years ago, they got it up — but it didn’t last.

Last year, they couldn’t get it up at all.

This year, they got it up several times. But something went wrong, so they tucked it away and went home.

They have my sympathy.

CADA AÑO A finales de julio or principios de agosto, la ciudad de Sevilla trae un globo de aire caliente a la playa de nuestro barrio, Los Boliches, en Fuengirola. Es un poco de publicidad para Sevilla. Le dan a la gente paseos libres mientras están atados — el globo, no la gente.

Hace dos años, lo levantaron, pero no por mucho tiempo.

El año pasado, no podían levantarlo en absoluto.

Este año, lo levantaron varias veces. Pero algo salió mal, así que lo guardaron y volvieron a casa.

Tienen my simpatía.

LAST YEAR: IT LOOKED PROMISING.
EL AÑO PASADO: PARECÍA PROMETEDOR.
THERE JUST WASN’T MUCH THERE.
SIMPLEMENTE NO HABÍA MUCHO ALLÍ.

THIS YEAR: THEY GOT IT UP!
ESTE AÑO. LO LEVANTARON!
BUT IT HAD NO STAYING POWER.
PERO NO TENÍA PODER DE PERMANENCIA.

They Can’t Get It Up / No Pueden Levantarlo

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

EVERY YEAR AT the end of July or the beginning of August, the City of Sevilla brings a hot-air balloon to our neighborhood beach, Los Boliches, in Fuengirola. It’s a bit of publicity for Sevilla. They give people free rides while tethered — the balloon, not the people.

Two years ago, they got it up — but it didn’t last.

Last year, they couldn’t get it up at all.

This year, they got it up several times. But something went wrong, so they tucked it away and went home.

They have my sympathy.

CADA AÑO A finales de julio or principios de agosto, la ciudad de Sevilla trae un globo de aire caliente a la playa de nuestro barrio, Los Boliches, en Fuengirola. Es un poco de publicidad para Sevilla. Le dan a la gente paseos libres mientras están atados — el globo, no la gente.

Hace dos años, lo levantaron, pero no por mucho tiempo.

El año pasado, no podían levantarlo en absoluto.

Este año, lo levantaron varias veces. Pero algo salió mal, así que lo guardaron y volvieron a casa.

Tienen my simpatía.

LAST YEAR: IT LOOKED PROMISING.
EL AÑO PASADO: PARECÍA PROMETEDOR.
THERE JUST WASN’T MUCH THERE.
SIMPLEMENTE NO HABÍA MUCHO ALLÍ.

THIS YEAR: THEY GOT IT UP!
ESTE AÑO. LO LEVANTARON!
BUT IT HAD NO STAYING POWER.
PERO NO TENÍA PODER DE PERMANENCIA.

Monkey Fish / Pescado De Mono

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.


When we lived in Sevilla from 2011 to 2013, we lived above one of the best and most popular seafood tapas restaurants in town. The restaurant was Dos de Mayo and the manager’s name was Paco. He is charming, hardworking, a great team leader, and a natural comic. His English at the time was limited but he loved to try.

Customers ordered at the bar and then picked up the food when it was ready. There was a speaker system so people outside could hear when their orders were ready. One evening, San Geraldo grabbed a stand-up table outside and I went in to order our food. I then waited with San Geraldo. Soon, Paco proudly annnounced, “Vecinos (neighbors)! Please to pick up your monkeyfish.” We had ordered monkfish, which in Spanish is called rape (RAH-pay).

Cuando vivimos en Sevilla de 2011 a 2013, vivimos por encima de uno de los mejores y más populares restaurantes de tapas de mariscos. El restaurante se llama Dos de Mayo y el jefe se llama Paco. Paco es muy amable. Encantador, trabajador, un gran líder de equipo, y muy gracioso. Su inglés era limitado, pero le encantaba intentar.

Los clientes pidieron en el bar y luego recogió la comida cuando estaba listo. Había un sistema para que la gente fuera podía oír cuando sus pedidos estaban listos. Una noche, San Geraldo encontró una mesa de pie fuera y fui a pedir nuestra comida. Entonces esperé con San Geraldo. Pronto Paco anunció con orgullo, “Vecinos,” y continua en inglés, “Please to pick up your monkeyfish.” En español: “Por favor, recoja su pescado de mono”. Habíamos pedido rape, que se llama en inglés “monkfish” (pescado de monje).

MONKEY FISH… AHEM, MONKFISH ACROSS THE STREET TODAY.
PESCADO DE MONO… EJEM, RAPE (MONKFISH — PESCADO DE MONJE, EN INGLÉS), HOY EN FUENGIROLA.

One monkey[fish] don’t stop no show…
Un [pescado de] mono no para un espectáculo…

Oh My Sweet Torrijas!

I went for a 7.25km (4.5-mile) walk Wednesday to one end of the Paseo and back (it’s become my short walk). A healthy walk is part of my daily routine. But yesterday it was especially needed to burn off the lemon merengue pie Chef Robbie insisted we try with our morning coffee.

San Geraldo arrived home a few minutes after I did. “I bought us a treat!” he said.

I saw bakery wrapping and thought, “Oh, crap. So much for my walk.”

But then he unwrapped the paper. And I thought, “SO glad I took that walk.”

TORRIJAS!!! AN EASTER TRADITION.

The first time I had torrijas was during Semana Santa 2012 (Holy Week) in Sevilla. I bought them in a local bakery. They were good, but nothing to write home about — so I didn’t, and quickly forgot about them.

Last year, Elena made us some that were, as San Geraldo said, “to die for.” (Click here for Elena’s torrijas and a glimpse of the Easter Moose.)

This year’s bakery torrijas, smothered in honey, were sweet and delicious but nothing like Elena’s. And we still have Elena’s to look forward to (hint, hint).

Recipes
If you’re interested in making torrijas, just search “torrijas recipes” or “recetas torrijas” and you’ll find plenty of versions (and opinions). Last year, I explained:

Elena’s version consists of a thick slice of bread soaked in warm milk for an hour, and then dipped in egg batter and fried with olive oil before being sprinkled with cinnamon. The bread gets crusty on the outside and custard-like on the inside. Elena’s torrijas are out of this world.

The bread is often soaked overnight and wine can be used instead of milk. Traditional recipes call for the addition of honey, which The Goddess Elena doesn’t like. But we’re not complaining. (She doesn’t like raisins either, and calls them flies.)

In my opinion, if you only dip the bread in the batter, as some recipes suggest, instead of soaking it for an hour or more, the result is pretty much like American “French Toast.” The extended soaking changes the consistency of the bread to custard. So much better (again, in my opinion).