I can do that / Puedo hacer eso

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

THE MAYOR OF MIJAS, THE neighbouring city equal in size to Fuengirola (about 80,000 residents) has proposed that our two cities be considered one municipality for the sake of these current restrictions. Along the borders, you can’t tell one city from another. Cross a street, you’re in Mijas. Many people will even argue whether you’re in one or the other. Jesica lives in Mijas and we can’t meet for coffee and English lessons this week because she can’t enter Fuengirola. We await the verdict from the powers that be in Andalucía. However, it’s possible that we will only be merged with Mijas Las Laguna, the neighbourhood most closely aligned with Fuengirola. In that case, Jesica and I might have to try online lessons.

Some of the new rules are becoming more clear (kind of like mud). Restaurants must close before 6 p.m. That puts a major cramp in Spanish-style dinner, which doesn’t begin until at least 9 p.m. We may have to have our big meal some days at lunch (much healthier anyway), so we can enjoy the food at Mesón Salvador (and support them). The curfew begins at 10 p.m., but after 6, outdoor activities are limited. Sometimes, those activities are clear; other times, not. San Geraldo was able to go grocery shopping yesterday evening and I saw people out running (or maybe they were running from the police). I think I’ll have it all figured out by the time the restrictions are lifted (I hope) on 23 November. We’ll do what we need to do, even if we don’t completely understand.

There’s currently a 2 percent chance of rain, which means there are clouds in the sky. It’s very exciting. The chance goes up to 10 percent overnight. I’ve included photos of this morning’s Mediterranean skies. I love clouds — especially since we don’t see any for most of 320 days each year.

Last week, during those couple of days of rain, the surfers were out in force. The photo above is of a group that made it look easy (well, mostly). I can do that! I can also do what the two guys are doing in the animation at the end. Well, I couldn’t do that last week. But I’m pretty sure I can do it today. Oh, never mind, I just watched them again. There’s one move that is still not going to happen!

Flu shots today. San Geraldo’s is at 6:02 p.m. (18:02) and mine is at 6:06 (18:06) — on the dot (more or less).

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EL ALCALDE DE MIJAS, LA ciudad vecina del mismo tamaño que Fuengirola (unos 80.000 habitantes) ha propuesto que nuestras dos ciudades se consideren un solo municipio por el bien de estas restricciones actuales. A lo largo de las fronteras, no se puede distinguir una ciudad de otra. Cruza la calle, estás en Mijas. Mucha gente incluso discutirá si estás en uno u otro. Jesica vive en Mijas y no podemos reunirnos para tomar un café y tomar lecciones de inglés esta semana porque no puede cruzar a Fuengirola. Esperamos el veredicto de los poderes que estén en Andalucía. Sin embargo, es posible que solo nos fusionemos con Mijas Las Laguna, el barrio más alineado con Fuengirola. En ese caso, Jesica y yo podríamos tener que probar lecciones en línea.

Algunas de las nuevas reglas se están volviendo más claras (algo así como barro). Los restaurantes deben cerrar antes de las 6 p.m. Eso pone un gran calambre en la cena al estilo español, que no comienza hasta al menos las 9 p.m. Es posible que tengamos que tener nuestra gran comida algunos días en el almuerzo (mucho más saludable de todos modos), para poder disfrutar de la comida en Mesón Salvador (y apoyarlos). El toque de queda comienza a las 10 p.m., pero después de las 6, las actividades al aire libre son limitadas. A veces, esas actividades son claras; otras veces, no. San Geraldo pudo ir de compras ayer por la noche y vi gente corriendo (o tal vez huyendo de la policía). Creo que lo tendré todo resuelto para cuando se levanten las restricciones (espero) el 23 de noviembre. Haremos lo que tengamos que hacer, incluso si no lo entendemos completamente.

Actualmente hay un 2 por ciento de probabilidad de lluvia, lo que significa que hay nubes en el cielo. Es muy emocionante. La probabilidad aumenta al 10 por ciento de la noche a la mañana. He incluido fotos de los cielos mediterráneos de esta mañana. Me encantan las nubes, especialmente porque no vemos ninguna durante la mayor parte de los 320 días del año.

La semana pasada, durante esos dos días de lluvia, los surfistas salieron con fuerza. La foto de arriba es de un grupo que hizo que pareciera fácil (bueno, en su mayoría). ¡Yo puedo hacer eso! También puedo hacer lo que los dos chicos están haciendo en la animación al final. Bueno, no pude hacer eso la semana pasada. Pero estoy bastante seguro de que puedo hacerlo hoy. Oh, no importa, acabo de verlos de nuevo. ¡Hay un movimiento que todavía no va a suceder!

Vacunas de la gripe hoy. San Geraldo’s es a las 18:02 y el mío es a las 18:06 — en el punto (más o menos).

Moose

The Perfect Martina in Mijas Pueblo

Before taxiing up to Mijas Pueblo Monday morning, I did some research on restaurants and found one that sounded good for lunch. Described by visitors as “off the beaten path” and “a quiet escape,” Restaurante La Martina sounded like a good option.

It was better than good. It’s on one of the main pedestrian streets in the center of town but the neighborhood very quickly became residential. In addition, La Martina is up some steps on a terrace that overlooks the street. The terrace was inviting but the sun was hot so I peeked inside. The long narrow interior opened onto another terrace out back. That terrace was even more inviting. We sat, the waiter rolled out an awning to provide some shade, and the day got even better. (Click the images to see how much better things got.)

THE FRONT TERRACE ON CALLE MÁLAGA.
THE BACK TERRACE.
FRIED CAMEMBERT TOPPED WITH RASPBERRY JAM.
COMPLEMENTS OF THE HOUSE.
HOMEMADE CHICKEN PATE.
MY REVUELTO (SPANISH SCRAMBLE) WITH SHRIMP AND MUSHROOMS.
JUDY’S REVUELTO WITH ASPARAGUS AND IBERIAN HAM.
LOOKING BACK DOWN CALLE MÁLAGA AFTER LUNCH.

Mijas Pueblo: A White Village

Andalusia is noted for, among so many things, its Pueblos Blancos (White Villages). There is a series of famed pueblos blancos along a recommended route through the northern parts of Cádiz and Málaga provinces. The villages are characterized by whitewashed walls and traditional red/brown tile roofs. Some were settled in prehistoric times and the cave paintings can still be seen. Roman ruins, ancient defensive walls, charm, and amazing vistas.

We have our own beautiful example here in the south just 7 kilometres away in the mountains and it’s called Mijas Pueblo. It’s a 10 minute car, bus, or taxi ride and it’s taken me more than three years to get there. Judyshannonstreetwhat and I visited Mijas Pueblo Monday. From the top, we could see our home in Fuengirola, which seemed ages away.

And there was great shopping and seriously good food, too!  Food photos are still to come.


(Click the images for grander views.)

How Delightfully Droll

Saturday afternoon, I took a walk in “the country.” I usually plan my walks around town to stay as close to the beach for as long as I can, but I decided this time, to head away from the water, mostly north through the neighbourhood of Los Pacos. It’s an easy 10-minute walk from home, but once you get past the center of Los Pacos — perhaps another 10 minutes — the look rapidly changes. I wondered at first when it was going to become more rural and then I heard a rooster crow. I turned another corner, the pavement ended, and the “country” appeared.

(Click any image for the big country.)

JUST BEFORE I HEARD THE COCK CROW.
(THAT’S MIJAS PUEBLO IN THE FOOTHILLS OF THE SIERRA DE MIJAS)
SORRY! I SPOOKED A FLOCK OF EGRETS IN A FIELD.

I didn’t spend the weekend, but I did experience a couple of hours of “enchanting.”