Holy Moses! / ¡Santo Moisés!

La versión español está después del primer charco.

SUNDAY WE MET good friends Nick, Alyson, their teen-aged son Edward, and Nick’s mother, Penny, for dinner on what started out as a pleasant evening (weather-wise). But it started to pour while we were inside and continued to drizzle for our walk home. As you’ll see from the photos, San Geraldo has never grown up. Nor is he a very mature influence for “young-by-comparison” Nick. Although they both got wet, Nick noticed that he got much more wet than San Geraldo, for whom the waters seemed to part. The man is a saint after all.

(Click any of the images to see them individually and enlarged.)

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Edward found the “children” very entertaining. / Edward encontró a los “niños” muy entretenidos.

EL DOMINGO, NOS reunimos con los buenos amigos Nick, Alyson, su hijo Edward, de edad adolescente, y la madre de Nick, Penny, para cenar en lo que comenzó como una noche agradable (en cuanto al clima). Pero comenzó a derramarse mientras estábamos dentro y continuamos lloviznando para nuestro camino a casa.

Como verás en las fotos, San Geraldo nunca ha crecido. Tampoco es una influencia muy madura para Nick “joven en comparación”. Aunque ambos se mojaron, Nick notó que se mojó mucho más que San Geraldo, de quien parecían separarse las aguas. Bueno, el hombre es un santo después de todo.

(Haz clic en cualquiera de las imágenes para verlas individualmente y ampliadas).

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Oh, No-ah! / Oh, ¡No-é!

La versión español está después de la primera foto.

IT’S BEEN RAINING and raining for forty daysy daysy.

Well, not quite. It’s been less than a week.

And the sun does come out every now and again.

Sometimes it only drizzles.

And sometimes it doesn’t rain at all. Saturday was actually sunny. Today, too.

But ask San Geraldo and he’ll tell you it’s been raining for forty (frikkin’) days.

I haven’t seen Noah and his ark in recent days (click here). When I saw him last week, he had added a lot more cardboard (and masking tape!) to his construction. But he appeared very nautical in his new skipper’s cap. At least he’ll look rakish when the boat sinks (if it hasn’t already).

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HA ESTADO LLOVIENDO durante cuarenta días.

Bueno, no del todo. Ha pasado menos de una semana.

Y hay sol del vez en cuando

A veces solo llovizna.

Y a veces no llueve en absoluto. El sábado era en realidad soleado. Hoy, también.

Pero pregúntale a San Geraldo y te dirá que ha estado lloviendo durante cuarenta (frikkin’) días.

No he visto a Noé y su arca en los últimos días (haz clic aquí). Cuando lo vi la semana pasada, había añadido mucho más cartón (y cinta adhesiva de papel!) a su construcción. Pero él aparecía muy náutico en su nueva gorra de capitán. Al menos se verá descabellada cuando el barco se hunda (si no lo ha hecho ya).

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SKIPPER NOAH AND HIS OFFICIAL CAP / EL CAPITÁN NOÉ Y SU GORRA OFICIAL.

Thunder’s Just A Lot Of Noise

When I was 15, I began working at a summer camp called Kiwi Day Camp. It was run by the New York Association for Brain-Injured Children. (Yes, they actually named a camp for children with disabilities for a bird that can’t fly.) The camp director loved to play “records” on rainy days when we were all confined to the auditorium. He had a favorite record and I found most of the songs annoying, especially the one about thunder and lightning. So, of course, every time there’s a storm, that song loops in my head.

We are in the midst of a huge storm that started during the night and, since misery loves company, I thought I’d share the song with you.

Listen while you look at the pictures (which you can click to make bigger).

THUNDER… LIGHTNING… AT 4 A.M.



“When the thunder comes with a boom boom boom,
we get out our drums and we ‘roon-toon-toon'”?

THUNDER… LIGHTNING… THUNDER… LIGHTNING…
… AT 4:30. I WAS TOO EXCITED TO SLEEP.

AND AGAIN… SO GRATEFUL FOR OUR GLASS CURTAIN!

THE CAFE, MY FRIEND, IS BLOWING IN THE WIND.
NO LONGER ANY NEED TO USE THE DOOR.
THE WAITRESS’ STEAMING WET SHOES.
FORTUNATELY, THEY DIDN’T START SMOKING, WHICH IS PROHIBITED.

What A Glorious Feeling

Honey, we’re ho-ome!

We were supposed to be in London until Wednesday, for a total of 7 days. But, after two days, San Geraldo had had enough and asked if he could come home Sunday. He said I could stay in London if I wanted but I wouldn’t have enjoyed it without him. Besides, the weather was a lot more depressing than I thought it would be. We have clearly been spoiled by years in Mediterranean climates!

We did have an exceptional time while we were there. We simply should have planned a four-day instead of seven-day holiday. We returned home to rain. But rain and 15C (59F) is a lot easier to tolerate than rain and 2C (35F).

MARBLE ARCH, IN THE RAIN AND SNOW, AS VIEWED FROM A LONDON TAXI.

The photos and stories of London are still to come. Last night, we dropped our bags at home and went to Primavera for dinner. Tynan and Elena met us there. The walk home in the warmish pouring rain was a delight. Until, that is, San Geraldo jumped into a puddle and soaked me. Elena then jumped in a puddle and soaked San Geraldo, which distracted him from me. Kids!

(Click the images to increase the immaturity.)

THE PAVEMENT AND ROAD AS WE LEFT PRIMAVERA LAST NIGHT.
AT LEFT, TYNAN ACTING MISLEADINGLY MATURE.

Once Elena and San Geraldo had enough, Tynan began his rendition of “Singing in the Rain.” It would have been perfect [no it wouldn’t] had it not been for his rubber-soled shoes.

You’d Better Never Bother With Me Ol’ Bamboo

That “bamboo” that has been washing up on our beaches with every recent rainstorm is not bamboo after all (click here). San Geraldo was right to question “where all that bamboo is coming from.” He finally suggested it was “fake Pampas Grass.” I got what he meant: Something that looks so much like Pampas Grass that it is often mistaken for it.

So I Googled: “What looks like pampas grass and bamboo, but is not.” Well, San Geraldo was right (imagine that).

NOT BAMBOO, NOR PAMPAS GRASS.

The scientific name is Arundo donax (click here if you’d like to learn about it — for next week’s exam), but a couple of its common names are Giant Cane or Spanish Cane. It’s native to the Mediterranean. Until yesterday evening we had a ‘Giant Giant Cane’ mountain across the street. Crews worked for more than 12 hours to pile it all up and then load and haul away several truckloads. There were mounds of the cane all along the beaches of Fuengirola. A huge job.

BLUE SKIES AND SUNSHINE BEFORE THE CLOUDS RETURNED.
SNOW AND CLOUDS ON THE MOUNTAINS BEYOND.
A SMALLER LOAD NOT FAR FROM THE PORT.

Thanks to a recent comment by Walt (click here for his blog called “wcs”),
I felt inspired to include this video.
(In other words, blame Walt.)