Jeepers Creepers

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

JEEPERS CREEPERS, WHERE’D you get those peepers? Or in this case, where’d you get those Peeps? While we were in Las Vegas in February, I decided to find something traditionally American for Easter to bring back to Spain for some of our friends. And what could be more traditionally American for Easter than Peeps? Those marshmallow (pure sugar) baby chicks and bunny rabbits covered in a slightly crusty coating (of sugar) and dotted with little chocolate (sugary) eyes. And, best of all, they’re non-fat and gluten-free!

I ALSO BROUGHT BACK A couple of special items for my 3-year-old pal Luke — a plastic wind-up Easter bunny that walks and poops jelly beans, and a container of Fluffy Marshmallow Chick Slime, which contains three little chicks. The container says it’s scented. I don’t know if it smells like marshmallows or chickens.

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JEEPERS CREEPERS, ¿DE dónde obtuviste esos peepers [ojitos]? (Esa es una canción vieja y famosa de los Estados Unidos). O en este caso, ¿De dónde sacaste esos Peeps? Mientras estábamos en Las Vegas en febrero, decidí buscar algo tradicionalmente estadounidense para Semana Santa que traería a España para algunos de nuestros amigos. ¿Y qué podría ser más tradicionalmente estadounidense para Semana Santa que Peeps? Esos pollitos de malvavisco (azúcar pura) y conejitos cubiertos con una capa ligeramente crujiente (de azúcar) y salpicados de ojitos de chocolate (azúcarado). Y, lo mejor de todo, ¡son sin grasa y sin gluten!

NOTA: “Peep” es el sonido que hace un pollito.

TAMBIÉN TRAJE UN PAR DE artículos especiales para mi compadre Luke (él tiene 3 años): Un “Easter Bunny” [Conejito de Semana Santa] de plástico que camina y rellena gomitas (en inglés, el Easter Bunny es un conejo que trae Huevos de Pascua); y un envase de “Fluffy Marshmallow Chick Slime” [“Malvavisco Esponjoso Baba de Pollitos”], que contiene tres pollitos (plasticos). El envase dice que está perfumado. No sé si huele a malvaviscos (nubes) o gallinas.

On The Eighth Day Of Christmas

This New Year’s Eve was one of the most joyous and memorable we’ve had. Tynan and Elena (and the kids, Alexander and Paula) hosted us at their house, along with their dear old friend Jim.

Elena, from Bilbao, cooked her traditional fish soup, the only fish soup I have ever liked. It’s unbelievably good. Elena also served an excellent meat/potato pie (because Tynan was having a craving). And there was a feast of tapas before dinner.

Elena was working in the kitchen when we arrived and greeted us in an elegant (not) Fuengirola-style (definitely) outfit.

Tynan had a beautiful fire burning in the fireplace — on the TV screen. He briefly changed it to Darth Vader’s funeral pyre, which apparently burns for five hours. But we only lasted five minutes before begging him to change it back.

After dinner, and before the countdown to midnight and the traditional consuming of 12 grapes to bring good luck in the New Year, San Geraldo led us in a rousing rendition of “The 12 Days of Christmas.”

We then turned off the “fireplace” to join in the television countdown. One of the presenters created quite a stir with her bizarre get-up. She was all over the newspapers on New Year’s Day — after being all over on New Year’s Eve. It would have worked much better had her co-presenter worn something similar (well, maybe not). (Click the pictures to see them in all their glory.)

WE MADE THE SAME FACE.
PAULA DOESN’T KNOW I MANAGED TO GET A PICTURE.
(DON’T TELL.)
I SUCCESSFULLY DOWNED ALL 12 GRAPES.
JUDY NEEDED SMALLER GRAPES (OR A BIGGER MOUTH).
AND THERE’S SAN GERALDO AND HIS HEAVENLY GLOW.
(REALLY THE GOLDEN GLOW OF THE FIVE RINGS.)

Since I accidentally deleted my video of our final verse (dammit),
here’s another non-traditional rendition of the song.

Feria Del Rosario Fine Finery

After a summer of never being quite sure where I was when I woke up in the morning, I am finally a little less confused.

We’re beginning to settle back into some sort of routine, getting used to the fact that daily emails and weekly Skypes with The Dowager Duchess are no longer a part of it.

One thing that makes it clear we’re back in Spain is the fact that, within two weeks of our return, there’s another fair in town.

This is the Annual Fiesta del Rosario, which commemorates the 1571 victory of a coalition of European Catholic maritime states (mostly financed by the Spanish Empire) in a major naval battle against the Ottoman Empire.

I have a feeling most contemporary celebrants have no idea. It’s just another excuse to get decked out. ride your horse to Fuengirola’s fairgrounds … and dance.

(Lots of photos. No captions. Click to enlarge and imagine your own stories.)

OK, ONE CAPTION: THIS MADE ME THINK OF THE SONG “TRADITION” IN “FIDDLER ON THE ROOF.”
“OF COURSE, THERE WAS THE TIME WHEN HE SOLD HIM A HORSE BUT DELIVERED A MULE.”

From Toledo to Corpus Christi

In the past few weeks we’ve gone from Toledo to Corpus Christi. And we haven’t left Spain.

Corpus Christi is a “feast” celebrating the belief in the body and blood of Christ in the Eucharist (bread and wine). That’s all the religion you’ll get from me today.

I attended the festivities because Paula (Tynan and Elena’s adored 13-year-old daughter who is a gifted oboe player) was marching at noon in Benalmádena Pueblo. Benalmádena is the town just east of us. Benalmádena Pueblo is the old town and a white village similar to Mijas Pueblo (click here).

A tradition at Corpus Christ is to adorn procession routes with intricate flower mosaics. The art on Calle Real was lovingly created in the morning and happily trod upon a few hours later. Other streets were strewn with carnations and greenery, terraces were adorned with elegant shawls and tapestries, walls were lined with flowers and plants.

It was promoted as the festival of Corpus Christi only because they couldn’t publicly admit that all the festivities were in honor of our upcoming 5-year renewal (see yesterday’s post).

(Click the images to see how big Benalmádena Pueblo went in our honor.)

MY FIRST VIEW FROM THE TOP OF CALLE REAL.

WORKING MY WAY DOWN CALLE REAL.
CONTINUING ALONG THE WAY.
REACHING THE END
(AND ALL BEFORE THE MAJOR CROWSD ARRIVED).
CALLE ALAMOS DECORATED AND STREWN WITH CARNATIONS AND GREENERY.
PLAZA DE ESPAÑA.
CALLE ALAMOS FROM THE OTHER DIRECTION.
LOCAL PRIVATE DISPLAYS OUTSIDE HOMES.
(ABOVE, AND THE TWO THAT FOLLOW.)
A LOCAL BROTHERHOOD’S TRIBUTE
ON PLAZA ANDALUCÍA.
AFTER THE PARADE PASSES BY.
OUR FAVORITE PAULA!
MY FEET AT THE END OF THE RAINBOW…

Sorry for the poor sound quality.
This band is really good!

A final note (and smile) from Paula…