Jad the Magician / El Mago Jad

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

IT’S BEEN A difficult week. Not long before I was told I shouldn’t eat chocolate — gasp — The Kid Brother had a personal issue that has caused some drama. He’s fine but things at his apartment are a bit unsettled. It’s been difficult for me to turn off my brain and simply relax, so it was wonderful last night to go to another local favorite restaurant, Santorini, where, as usual, we were welcomed like family and then started off with dolmades (stuffed grape leaves) and tzatziki (yogurt, cucumber, garlic, and mint).

The owners’ son, Jad, is in his gap year before starting university. He’s spending the year traveling the world, with work stints at the restaurant to pay for it all. He’s a charmer and, we learned, a bit of a magician. He asked if we had a 5 or 10 euro note so he could do a magic trick. San Geraldo, the South Dakotan, was ready to give him a 50. I, the New Yorker, gave him a 5. Jad magically changed my mood.

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HA SIDO UNA semana difícil. No mucho antes de que me dijeran que no debería comer chocolate — ¡jadear! — The Kid Brother tuvo un problema personal que causó un poco de drama. Está bien, pero las cosas en su apartamento están un poco inquietas. Me ha resultado difícil apagar mi cerebro y simplemente relajarme, así que anoche fue maravilloso ir a otro restaurante local favorito, Santorini, donde, como de costumbre, nos recibieron como familia y luego empezamos con dolmadi (hojas de parra rellenas) y tzatziki (salsa griega de yogur, pepino, ajo, y menta).

Jad, el hijo de los propietarios, está en su año sabático antes de comenzar la universidad. Está pasando el año viajando por el mundo, con períodos de trabajo en el restaurante para pagar todo. Él es un encantador y, aprendimos, un poco de mago. Preguntó si teníamos un billete de 5 o 10 euros para poder hacer un truco de magia. San Geraldo, de Dakota del Sur, estaba listo para darle un 50. Yo, el neoyorquino, le di un 5. Jad cambió mi estado de ánimo mágicamente.

Chicken souvlaki with salad. / Brochetta de pollo con ensalada.

It’s Greek To Me

There’s a local Greek restaurant called Santorini that we had never tried before. It’s well-rated, so we decided to check it out the other night with Tynan and Elena.

I told San Geraldo and Tynan that it was a 5-minute walk from our apartment. It was 8 minutes. And those whiners had the nerve to complain.

So sue me.

Anyway, they didn’t complain once we were there. Friendly and excellent service. Delicious and authentic dishes. And very affordable prices. The menu includes Spanish dishes, as well. But we stuck with what we were there for and went totally Greek. (Oh, stop it.)


(Click the images and enlarge the delicious.)

DOLMADES — STUFFED GRAPE LEAVES.
TZATZIKI.
(YOGURT, LEMON JUICE, OLIVE OIL, PEPPER DILL, CUCUMBER.)
KEBAB WITH TZATZIKI AND RICE (AND SALAD).

A nearby foursome (I swear it wasn’t us) followed their meal with a flaming drink called Queimada. The drink originates in Galicia (northwestern Spain). (Learn about it here.)

Elena explained the drink to us. She’s from Northern Spain, although quite a long distance from Galicia. But she’s very smart. And she has quite a bit of experience with alcoholic beverages.

COME ON BABY,  LIGHT MY FIRE.
(NO FLOWERS WERE HARMED IN THE MAKING OF THIS DRINK.)