Twenty Acrobatic Tricks in a Row / Veinte Trucos Acrobáticos en Una Fila

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

WHEN WE FIRST met Nick and Alyson a few years ago during one of their visits to Fuengirola, Nick was charming, outgoing, and sometimes (like us), childlike. While Alyson was also warm and charming, she appeared to be very proper, polished, and adult. Well, appearances can be deceiving. Alyson knows how to have a good time and, she’s quite the daredevil. There aren’t too many adventures that would scare her off. For example, she has tried to convince San Geraldo that swimming with sharks is safe and wonderful (although she has a nervous breakdown if she sees a spider).

When we arrived Wednesday night at Fuengirola’s World People’s Fair, Alyson was drawn to any ride that went fast, backwards, and upside down. San Geraldo and I said we’d hold their bags. I spotted a wall nearby, pulled myself up (even WITH my Sciatica) like the trained acrobat that I am, and got comfortable. San Geraldo decided to do the same, but not with the same result. (He’s got a bit more to heft.) I finally pointed out some steps that led to the parking lot and suggested he use those and then climb DOWN onto the wall instead. Even that was not so easy to accomplish. And, when the ride was over and Nick and Alyson met up with us again, San Geraldo jumped into Alyson’s outstretched arms. I told you she’s a daredevil.

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CUANDO NOS CONOCIMOS por primera vez con Nick y Alyson hace unos años durante una de sus visitas a Fuengirola, Nick era encantador, extrovertido, y a veces (como nosotros), infantil. Si bien Alyson también era cálida y encantadora, parecía ser muy apropiada, pulida, y adulta. Bueno, las apariencias pueden engañar. Alyson sabe como pasarlo bien, y es bastanta una temeraria. No hay demasiadas aventuras que la asusten. Por ejemplo, ella ha tratado de convencer a San Geraldo de que nadar con tiburones es seguro y maravilloso (aunque ella tiene una crisis nerviosa si ve una araña).

Cuando llegamos la noche del miércoles a la Feria Internacional de los Pueblos de Fuengirola, Alyson se sintió atraída por cualquier atracción que fuera rápido y al revés. San Geraldo y yo dijimos que tendríamos los bolsos. Vi un muro cerca, me levanté (incluso CON mi ciática) como el acróbata entrenado que soy, y me puse cómodo. San Geraldo decidió hacer lo mismo, pero no con el mismo resultado. (Tiene un poco más de peso.) Finalmente señalé algunas escaleras que conducían al estacionamiento y le sugerí que las usara y luego BAJARA hacia la pared. Incluso eso no fue tan fácil de lograr. Y, cuando el paseo terminó y Nick y Alyson se encontraron de nuevo con nosotros, San Geraldo saltó a los brazos extendidos de Alyson. Te dije que ella es una temeraria.

I was actually trying to take a picture of the Hawaii pavilion in the background.
En realidad, estaba tratando de hacer una foto de la caseta de Hawai en el fondo.


NOTE: The title comes from a song in the musical “Chicago.”
NOTA: El título viene de una canción en el musical “Chicago.”

Airbag

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

FUENGIROLA’S 25TH ANNUAL World People’s Fair (Feria Internacional de Los Pueblos) opened Tuesday night and runs through Sunday. I was there twice Wednesday, first during the day to see the parade, and again that evening with friends. And, of course, I have lots of photos to share. But today’s post is mostly about Amir.

After the fair, we stopped for dinner at Pizzeria Picolo. It was late and quiet (which was a relief after the noise and crowds). Whenever I pass the place during the day, it’s busy, so I figured it was a good choice. It was. We had a great time, great food, and great service. Amir is the owner’s son. Charming, funny — and built like a brick house. San Geraldo asked him about his workout routine. He mentioned his six-pack and I commented that I had just learned that here in Spain it’s called a tableta de chocolate (chocolate bar). San Geraldo pointed to his own large chocolate bar and Amir said, “You’ve got something even bettter. You’ve got an airbag.” Amir’s lucky San Geraldo is such a gentle soul.

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LA FERIA INTERNACIONAL de Los Pueblos de Fuengirola abrió sus puertas el martes por la noche y se extiende hasta el domingo. Estuve allí dos veces el miércoles, primero durante el día para ver el desfile, y otra vez esa noche con amigos. Y, por supuesto, tengo muchas fotos para compartir. Pero el post de hoy es principalmente sobre Amir.

Después de la feria, paramos a cenar en Pizzeria Picolo. Era tarde y tranquilo (lo que fue un alivio después del ruido y las multitudes). Cuando paso por el lugar durante el día, está siempre ocupado, así que pensé que era una buena opción. Era. Tuvimos un gran momento, buena comida, y un gran servicio. Amir es el hijo del dueño. Encantador, divertido — y en inglés diríamos que él está construido como una casa de ladrillos.. San Geraldo le preguntó sobre su rutina de ejercicios. Mencionó su paquete de seis y comenté que acababa de enterarme de que aquí en España se llama tableta de chocolate (barra de chocolate). San Geraldo señaló su gran barra de chocolate y Amir dijo: “Tienes algo aún mejor. Tienes un airbag”. Amir tiene suerte que San Geraldo es un alma gentil.

Tequila!

This was the week of Feria del Virgen del Rosario (the fair of the Virgin of the Rosary), which culminates tomorrow with a procession if the weather cooperates. We’ve had rain and sun, with here and there a downpour, these last few days. Wednesday night (glorious weather), San Geraldo and I walked over to the fair.

OUR FIRST VIEW OF THE FAIR AS WE STROLLED OVER FROM THE BEACH.

Often, when we have friends visiting from the United States, they’re surprised by sales booths they spot at fairs and outside movie theaters. Invariably, someone will look dumb-founded and say, “They’re selling shots of tequila?!?”

TAH-KEY-YA!!!

OK, so the thought crossed my mind the first time I saw a booth, too. But then I realized it’s not spelled the same. It’s “taquilla” (pronounced tah-KEY-ya”) and not “tequila.” It’s a ticket booth. Given my one experience with tequila shots when I was 20 years old (sharing an entire bottle with one other person), I’m even a little afraid to approach the ticket booth.

Wednesday was Children’s Day at the fair. Well, every day is children’s day (and adults’ day) at the fair. But Wednesday, is the most popular day for children to dress in traditional costume.

THIS YEAR’S LIGHTS.
WAITING FOR THE PARTY TO START AT ONE OF THE CASETAS.
BUMPER BOATS! A BOY IN TRADITIONAL COSTUME.
HE LOOKS LIKE A BOWERY BOY TO ME.
SAN GERALDO LOVES SWEET CORN (CORN ON THE COB).
HE COMMENTED THAT HE NEVER SAW ANY AT THE FAIR THIS TIME.
I HADN’T EITHER… UNTIL I LOOKED AT MY PHOTOS THURSDAY MORNING.
ABOUT TO HEAD BACK THROUGH THE GATES.

Tequila!!!

Chocolate-Smothered Waffle: Better Going Down

San Geraldo and I went last night to Feria Málaga (Málaga Fair). Last year I enjoyed the daytime festivities in the center of the old city (click here to see last year’s blog post). This year, we decided to check out the nighttime festivities that take place outside the city center and just a bit closer to where we live.

Unlike the casetas at Feria Sevilla (click here to see those pictures), the casetas at Málaga are free and open to the public. We didn’t see the horses and carriages famous in Sevilla. And the traditional feria costumes, although in abundance, were less so than in Sevilla. But there was still plenty to see and experience and I found it less overwhelming than Sevilla’s fair. The fairgrounds are beautiful and sprawling and much more pleasant to explore. The lights were enchanting. The rides were fun to watch. Given how things progressed, it’s good I opted out of going on any.

As usual, click any image to see it big time.

The Lights

THE ENTRANCE.

The food all looked really delicious. I take that back. Some of the food looked really delicious. However, there were a number of “edibles” that looked radioactive. San Geraldo and I succumbed to enticing gofres (waffles) smothered in chocolate. It was so good going down. About a half hour later, however, the waffle and chocolate decided to repeat itself. And, let me just say, it wasn’t quite so delicious on the reflux. And there were no antacids in sight. But, I soldiered on. What’s a little heartburn?

At 11 p.m., we caught the next to last train for home. It was crowded with fair-goers, so we stood most of the way. I felt fine. But we sat for the last three stops and the waffle and chocolate decided to make another return visit (I probably shouldn’t have bent at the waist).

The Food

MINE. MINE. MINE. MINE. MINE.
IGNORANCE IS BLISS.

One stop before home, I stood up, looked at San Geraldo and said, “I feel sick.” (Apologies to my third-grade teacher; I know I’m supposed to say “ill,” not “sick.” But her name was Mrs. Doody, so…) 

But back to the train. The doors opened and I signaled to San Geraldo that when I said sick, I meant I-need-to-get-off-the-train sick. He jumped off behind me at a, thankfully, dark and empty station. I quickly headed to the railing and wretched into the bushes. Now, don’t get all squeamish on me (although I would in your shoes). Nothing serious happened. Just a case of powerful reflux. And then all was well.

Truthfully, I did it all just to get San Geraldo to take a walk with me. That station is about 1.5 km (1 mile) from home.

The People

FREEZE FRAME:  THEY ONLY MOVED TO SHAKE HANDS
WHEN THEY WERE GIVEN A TIP (WHICH WAS OFTEN).

AND SPEAKING OF DELICIOUS…
WITH HIS PLEASANT (AND PROUD) GRANDPARENTS.