A space odyssey / Un odisea en el espacio

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

WHEN THE YEAR 2001 BEGAN, San Geraldo called it Two-Oh-Oh-One, as opposed to Two-Thousand-One or Two-Thousand-and-One. I pointed it out to him and even mentioned the film (“2001: A Space Odyssey”) to help him remember, but he never caught on.

I was relieved when we reached 2010 (yes, it took that long), because he called that Twenty-Ten. I was seriously expecting to progress (painfully) through the century: Two-Oh-One-Oh, Two-Oh-One-One, Two-Oh-One-Two… you get the idea. The years since have been easily understood.

Still, it’s no surprise that, yesterday, when SG said “I have this photo from Twenty-Eight” that I wasn’t sure what he meant. “You mean Two-Thousand-Eight?” I asked.

“No,” he replied a bit condescendingly, “Nineteen-Twenty-Seven.”

“What?”

“Nineteen-Twenty-Seven.”

“But you said Twenty-Eight.”

“What?”

“I thought you meant Two-Thousand-Eight, because you said Twenty-Eight. Now you’re saying Twenty-Seven.”

“Oh.”

“I thought we were back to that ‘Two-Oh-Oh-One’ thing you used to do, only with a new twist. So, is it 1927 or 1928?”

“I forgot I did that. I can understand your confusion.”

It’s like talking to The Kid Brother. And I still don’t know if he meant 27 or 28!

The pictures of clouds seem appropriate. The final two are from the terrace this morning at 8:30. The rest are from yesterday’s drizzly walk on the beach, including the video of the surf.

.

CUANDO EMPEZÓ EL AÑO 2001, San Geraldo lo llamó Dos-Oh-Oh-Uno, en oposición a Dos-Mil-Uno. Se lo señalé e incluso mencioné la película (“2001: Una Odisea en el Espacio”) para ayudarlo a recordar, pero nunca se dio cuenta.

Me sentí aliviado cuando llegamos al 2010 (sí, tomó tanto tiempo), porque él lo llamó Twenty-Ten (Veinte-Diez, que es correcto en inglés). En serio esperaba progresar (dolorosamente) a lo largo del siglo: Dos-Oh-Uno-Oh, Dos-Oh-Uno-Uno, Dos-Oh-Uno-Dos … ya entiendes la idea. Los años transcurridos desde entonces se han entendido fácilmente.

Aún así, no es de extrañar que, ayer, cuando SG dijo “Tengo esta foto de Twenty-Eight (Veinte-Ocho)”, no estaba seguro de lo que quería decir. “¿Te refieres a dos mil ocho?” yo pregunté.

“No”, respondió un poco condescendiente, “mil novecientos veintisiete”.

“¿Qué?”

“Mil novecientos veintisiete”.

Pero dijiste veintiocho.”

“¿Qué?”

“Pensé que te referías a Dos Mil Ocho, porque dijiste Veintiocho. Ahora estás diciendo veintisiete”.

“Oh.”

“Pensé que habíamos vuelto a esa cosa de ‘Dos-Oh-Oh-Uno’ que solías hacer, solo que con un nuevo giro. Entonces, ¿es 1927 o 1928?”

“Olvidé que hice eso. Puedo entender tu confusión”.

Es como hablar con El Hermanito. ¡Y todavía no sé si se refería a 27 o 28!

Las imágenes de nubes parecen apropiadas hoy. Las dos últimas son desde la terraza esta mañana a las 8:30. El resto son del paseo lluvioso de ayer por la playa, incluido el video de las olas.

J is for Junebug / J es para Junebug

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

YESTERDAY, IN THE ABRIDGED VERSION of my convoluted phone conversation with The Kid Brother, I explained how I determined that a card from Jacksonville, Florida, was from Jennifer (click here). Well, Jennifer wrote and said she’s from South Carolina. JanieJunebug (click here) wrote and said the card was from her. So, mystery solved and now I can’t wait to tell The Kid Brother about JanieJunebug and my confusion; he’s never confused. Janie, I’m sending you a safe cyberhug! And I’m sorry Jacksonville has a crappy football team.

It rained all night and is still raining as I write. A chilly 13C (55F) when I woke up at 8 this morning and it felt like 11 (52F) (that’s not my opinion, that’s The Weather Channel). Brrr. San Geraldo was already sitting in his office in a sweatshirt with the hood up. He had the space heater going. He asked me to come look at some old photos he had received. I nearly had heatstroke. Even Dudo left.

San Geraldo made a new (to us) dish for dinner last night. Chickpea stew from Delish.com. It was delish! (Note to Jesica: Delish is not a real English word; it’s short for delicious.) We had apple cake for dessert. This morning, I had my gourmet overnight oats and we had apple cake with our coffee/tea — because San Geraldo said we deserved it. I never argue. Well, hardly ever. OK, often. But always for a good reason. Except when I don’t have one.

.

AYER, EN LA VERSIÓN RESUMIDA de mi enrevesada conversación telefónica con El Hermanito, le expliqué cómo determiné que una tarjeta de Jacksonville, Florida, era de Jennifer (haz clic aquí). Bueno, Jennifer escribió y dijo que es de Carolina del Sur. JanieJunebug (haz clic aquí) escribió y dijo que la tarjeta era de ella. Entonces, misterio resuelto y ahora no puedo esperar para contarle a El Hermanito sobre JanieJunebug y mi confusión; él nunca está confundido. Janie, ¡te estoy enviando un abrazo cibernético seguro! Y lamento que Jacksonville tenga un equipo de fútbol de mierda.

Llovió toda la noche y sigue lloviendo mientras escribo. Un frío 13C (55F) cuando me desperté a las 8 esta mañana y me sentí como 11 (52) (esa no es mi opinión, es The Weather Channel). Brrr. San Geraldo ya estaba sentado en su oficina con una sudadera con la capucha levantada. Tenía encendido el calefactor. Me pidió que fuera a ver algunas fotos antiguas que había recibido. Casi tengo un golpe de calor. Incluso Dudo se fue.

San Geraldo preparó un plato nuevo (para nosotros) para la cena anoche. Guiso de garbanzos de Delish.com. ¡Fue delish! (Nota: Delish no es una palabra en inglés real; es la abreviatura de delicious). Tomamos tarta de manzana de postre. Esta mañana, comí mi avena gourmet durante la noche y comimos tarta de manzana con nuestro café / té, porque San Geraldo dijo que lo merecíamos. Yo nunca discuto. Bueno, casi nunca. OK, a menudo. Pero siempre por una buena razón. Excepto cuando no tengo uno.

SG omitted the anchovy and parsley.
SG omitió la anchoa y el perejil.
Wednesday sunrise.
Miércoles amanecer.
Thursday sunrise.
Jueves amanecer.
Some surfers arrived a couple of hours after sunrise.
Algunos surfistas llegaron unos horas después del amanecer.

A dog and a football team / Un perro y un equipo de fútbol

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

THE KID BROTHER SOUNDED VERY excited when he answered the phone last night. “I got two cards. And a card from you! I’ll go get ’em.” And he was gone. “I’ll be right back,” he yelled. I heard him having a loud running conversation with his roommate Chris about a game on TV as he crossed the apartment. He returned. “One has a football team. And there’s a dog,” he said.

“So, tell me about the one with the football picture on it first.”
“It’s not a picture. It’s a team.”
Oh… uh. “What’s the city?”
He spelled quickly and I caught on before he finished with a bit of a hiccup, “J-A-C-K-S-O-N-V-L-E… I-L-L-E.”
I said, “Jacksonville! That’s in Florida.”
“I know! I know!”
“Is that from Jennifer — J-E-N-N-I…” “Yeah!”
“She’s great,” I said. “Her husband’s name is Gregg. They have a parrot named Marco, and fish and a dog. She works at an elementary school and he designs aquariums. They’re good people.”
“I know!”
“Oh, I ’ve I told you about them before haven’t I?”
“No!” Yeah, I have. I’m already exhausted.
“OK, so tell me about the card with the dog,” I continued.
“What are you talking about?!? That is the card with the dog!”
“I thought that was the football card.”
“Now just wait a second! Hold on. Hold on. Just the city! They’re not doing very good.”
“Ohhhhhh. You recognised the city name Jacksonville in the address from the football team.”
“Yeah. They’re doing bad though.”
“Are they usually a good team?”
“Not really.”


“So tell me about the other card. What’s on that one?”
“I don’t know. It’s a picture.”
“It’s not flamingos? That’s what’s on the way from Anne Marie in Philly.”
“No. It’s a picture.”
“Is the name on the card B-O-B?”
“Yeah! That’s right!”
“Oh, that’s Bob. He’s a really good guy and he tells funny stories. His husband’s name is Carlos, like you, and they have cats, too. One looks like Dudo and Moose. His name is Tuxedo. But what’s on the card again?”
“I don’t know. A picture. Really nice colors.”
“Is it abstract art?”
“I think so.”
Given that “a lady not from these days turned out to be the Mona Lisa (click here), I’m curious to learn what Bob’s abstract art is all about.

The Kid Brother lost his patience with my slow-wittedness last night. San Geraldo heard some of my side of the conversation. He was laughing when I walked into his office. I told him all I had energy for was to to quickly jot it down and then go to bed. He’d have to get the other side today, along with you. He understood. San Geraldo always understands.

Bob, thanks a million, and now tell us about that abstract art. Jennifer, you truly are great and I’m sorry your football team is not.

NOTE:
The photo, taken by My Mother the Dowager Duchess, is from 1989. As The Kid Brother would have described us at the time, Your Big Son and The Big Guy.

MORE IMPORTANT NOTE:
Jennifer wrote and said she doesn’t live in Florida and the card wasn’t from her!

.

EL HERMANITO SONABA MUY ANIMADO cuando contestó el teléfono anoche. “Tengo dos cartas. ¡Y una tarjeta tuya! Iré a buscarlos”. Y se fue. “Vuelvo enseguida”, gritó. Lo escuché tener una conversación ruidosa con su compañero de cuarto Chris sobre un juego en la televisión mientras cruzaba el apartamento. El regresó. “Uno tiene un equipo de fútbol. Y hay un perro”, dijo.

“Entonces, cuéntame primero sobre el que tiene la imagen de fútbol”.
“No es una imagen. Es un equipo”.
Oh … eh. “¿Cuál es la ciudad?”
Deletreó rápidamente y me di cuenta antes de que terminara con un pequeño hipo, “J-A-C-K-S-O-N-V-L-E … I-L-L-E”.
Dije: “Oh, Jacksonville. Eso está en Florida”.
“¡Lo sé! ¡Lo sé!”
“Es eso de Jennifer – J-E-N-N-I …”
“¡Sí!”
“Ella es genial”, le dije. “El nombre de su esposo es Gregg. Tienen un loro llamado Marco, y peces y un perro. Ella trabaja en una escuela primaria y él diseña acuarios. Son buenas personas”.
“¡Lo sé! ¡Lo sé!”
“Oh, ya te he hablado de ellos antes, ¿no?”
“¡No!” (Sí, lo hice. Ya estoy exhausto).
“Bien, cuéntame sobre la tarjeta con el perro”.
“¿De qué estás hablando? ¡Esa es la tarjeta con el perro!”
“Pensé que era la tarjeta de fútbol”.
“¡Uf! ¡Espere un segundo! Espere. Espere. ¡Solo la ciudad! No lo están haciendo muy bien”.
“Ohhhhhh. Reconociste el nombre de la ciudad Jacksonville en la dirección del equipo de fútbol”.
“Si. Sin embargo, lo están haciendo mal”.
“¿Suelen ser un buen equipo?”
“Realmente no.”


“Entonces cuéntame sobre la otra carta. ¿Qué hay en ese?”
“No lo sé. Es una imagen”.
“¿No son flamencos? Eso es lo que viene de Anne Marie en Filadelfia”.
“No. Le dije, es una imagen”.
“¿El nombre de la tarjeta es B-O-B?”
“¡Si! ¡Así es!”
“Oh, ese es Bob. También es un buen tipo y cuenta historias divertidas. Su esposo se llama Carlos, como tú, y también tienen gatos. Uno se parece a Dudo y Moose. Su nombre es Tuxedo. Pero, ¿qué hay en la tarjeta de nuevo?”
“No lo sé. Una foto. Colores realmente bonitos”.
“¿Es arte abstracto?”
“Creo que sí.”
Dado que “una dama que no es de estos días” resultó ser la Mona Lisa (haz clic aquí), tengo curiosidad por saber de qué se trata el arte abstracto de Bob.

El Hermanito perdió la paciencia con mi torpeza anoche. San Geraldo escuchó algo de mi lado de la conversación. Se reía cuando entré a su oficina. Le dije que lo anotaría rápidamente y luego me iría a la cama. Tendría que llevarse al otro lado hoy contigo. Él entendió. San Geraldo siempre lo entiende.

Bob, un millón de gracias y ahora cuéntanos sobre ese arte abstracto. Jennifer, realmente eres genial y lamento que tu equipo de fútbol no lo sea.

NOTA: 
La foto, hecha por Mi Madre La Duquesa Viuda, es de 1989. Como El Hermanito nos habría descrito en ese momento, Su Hijo Grande y El Tipo Grande.

NOTA MÁS IMPORTANTE:
Jennifer escribió y dijo que no vive en Florida y que la tarjeta no era de ella.

Tarantula & Plan B

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

ALONG THE PASEO IS A small cafe that didn’t survive the pandemic. It had been named Plan B. I wonder if they’ve got a Plan C.

On my walk yesterday, in the middle of one of the roundabouts along the way, I passed a monument donated to the City of Fuengirola by the Lions Club. I wonder if we can give it back.

As I continued my long walk up the hill, I planned to continue walking to a nearby resort to get more photos in the very good light of a grouping of elephant sculptures (click here). But after walking about 4 km (2.5 miles), I came upon the sign across the road welcoming me to Benalmádena and I was reminded that that was as far as I was allowed to go. Our covid restrictions have been extended until 10 December and I can’t leave the municipality. So, sorry, no elephants.

On my way back, I spotted a tarantula in my path. I laughed to myself, ‘Oh, we don’t have those here.’ When I got closer I realized it was only a baby agave plant that had the misfortune of falling on pavement instead of dirt where it would have easily taken root. There were others. When I got home, I read up on tarantulas. We do have them in Andalucía.

When we lived in San Diego in the ’90s, I took a drive one day with a friend to the Wild Animal Park (now called the San Diego Zoo Safari Park) north of the city. We walked through the butterfly house and met a keeper holding a plastic terrarium containing a tarantula. My friend asked the keeper if it was dangerous. “Oh no,” she casually replied. “It’s no worse than a bee sting.” I backed up a few feet. I’m allergic to bee stings; that tarantula could kill me.

Some time later, a friend was visiting us from Los Angeles. We came home one evening and headed up the stairs to the front door of our condo building, which sat at the bottom of a canyon. A huge (seriously) tarantula sat in front of the door. Our friend and I headed back down the stairs. San Geraldo went inside, grabbed a broom, and swept the tarantula off the landing and into the shrubs — while I yelled “He’s going to grab that broom and toss you! We lived there another year and a half. I always entered through the garage.

.

JUNTO AL PASEO HAY UN pequeño café que no sobrevivió a la pandemia. Se llamaba Plan B. Me pregunto si tienen un Plan C.

En mi caminata de ayer, en medio de una de las rotondas del camino, pasé por un monumento donado al Ayuntamiento de Fuengirola por el Club de Leones. Me pregunto si podemos devolverlo.

Mientras continuaba mi larga caminata cuesta arriba, planeaba continuar caminando hasta un resort cercano para obtener más fotos a la muy buena luz de un grupo de esculturas de elefantes (haz clic aquí). Pero después de caminar unos 4 km (2,5 millas), me encontré con el letrero al otro lado de la carretera que me daba la bienvenida a Benalmádena y me recordó que eso era lo más lejos que se me permitía llegar. Nuestras restricciones de covid se han extendido hasta el 10 de diciembre y no puedo salir del municipio. Entonces, lo siento, no hay elefantes.

En mi camino de regreso, vi una tarántula. Me reí para mí mismo, ‘Oh, no tenemos esos aquí’. Cuando me acerqué me di cuenta de que era solo una planta de agave bebé que tuvo la desgracia de caer sobre el pavimento en lugar de tierra donde fácilmente habría echado raíces. Hubo otros. Cuando llegué a casa, leí sobre tarántulas. Los tenemos en Andalucía.

Cuando vivíamos en San Diego en los años 90, un día conduje con un amigo al Wild Animal Park [parque de animales salvajes] — now called San Diego Zoo Safari Park [zoológico de san diego, parque de safari] al norte de la ciudad. Caminamos por la casa de las mariposas y nos encontramos con un cuidador que sostenía un terrario de plástico que contenía una tarántula. Mi amigo le preguntó al portero si era peligroso. “Oh no,” respondió casualmente. “No es peor que la picadura de una abeja”. Retrocedí unos metros. Soy alérgico a las picaduras de abejas; esa tarántula podría matarme.

Algún tiempo después, un amigo nos visitó desde Los Ángeles. Llegamos a casa una noche y subimos las escaleras hasta la puerta principal de nuestro edificio de condominios, que estaba al pie de un cañón. Una enorme (en serio) tarántula se sentó frente a la puerta. Nuestro amigo y yo volvimos a bajar las escaleras. San Geraldo entró, tomó una escoba y arrastró la tarántula del rellano hacia los arbustos, mientras yo gritaba: “¡Él va a agarrar esa escoba y tirarte!” Vivimos allí otro año y medio. Siempre entraba por el garaje.

Still in Fuengirola.
Todavía en Fuengirola.
An agave flower stem covered with new plants after blooming.
Un tallo de flor de agave cubierto con plantas nuevas después de la floración.
San Diego condo. We lived so close to the San Diego Zoo, we could hear the lions roar at night.
Condominio en San Diego. Vivíamos tan cerca del zoológico de San Diego que podíamos oír rugir a los leones por la noche.

The sun will rise / El sol saldrá

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

I WON’T SAY MUCH TODAY; I don’t want to depress you. After a few surprisingly up and energised days, I crashed Sunday. I spent the entire day at home and I didn’t even do a load of laundry. I can usually at least count that as an accomplishment. No need to explain my crash. I regularly have them and, besides, almost everyone is having them these days. So, here are photos of today’s dramatic sunrise. I got out of bed around 7:40 and, after looking out the window, decided it wasn’t going to be much of an event. I went back to bed with my back to the window.

At 8:05 I was still awake; San Geraldo looked up and asked, “Did you see the sunrise?” I responded, “Why? Is it worth looking at now?” “Yes,” he said. So I walked out on the terrace in my underwear and enjoyed the view (although, I don’t know if any neighbours did, but very few can see onto our terrace anyway).

I had a great walk this morning, fully dressed. San Geraldo and I just had lunch — leftover pulled pork! My state of mind seems to be improving. I think I’ll throw in a load of laundry. Speaking of which, San Geraldo’s Norwegian grandmother would often tell him she was doing the “shittin’ laundry.” He was always surprised to hear his sweet grandmother so casually use such language. It wasn’t until years later that he learned that in Norwegian, “skitten” (pronounced “shittin”) is a word for dirty. Oh well, I guess I said more than I planned.

.

NO DIRÉ MUCH HOY; NO quiero deprimirte. Después de unos días sorprendentemente animados y llenos de energía, me estrellé el domingo. Pasé todo el día en casa y ni siquiera lavé una carga. Por lo general, al menos puedo contar eso como un logro. No es necesario que explique mi depresión. Los tengo habitualmente y, además, casi todo el mundo los tiene estos días. Entonces, aquí hay fotos del espectacular amanecer de hoy. Me levanté de la cama alrededor de las 7:40 y, después de mirar por la ventana, decidí que no iba a ser un gran evento. Volví a la cama de espaldas a la ventana. 

A las 8:05 todavía estaba despierto; San Geraldo miró hacia arriba y preguntó: “¿Viste el amanecer?” Respondí: “¿Por qué? ¿Vale la pena mirarlo ahora?” “Sí”, dijo. Así que salí a la terraza en ropa interior y disfruté de la vista (aunque no sé si algún vecino lo hizo, pero muy pocos pueden ver nuestra terraza de todos modos).

Tuve un gran paseo esta mañana, completamente vestido. San Geraldo y yo acabamos de almorzar — ¡sobras de cerdo desmenuzado! Mi estado de ánimo parece estar mejorando. Creo que arrojaré una carga de ropa sucia. Hablando de eso, la abuela noruega de San Geraldo solía decirle que estaba haciendo la “shittin’ laundry” (mierda de ropa). Siempre se sorprendió al escuchar a su dulce abuela usar ese lenguaje con tanta naturalidad. No fue hasta años después que se enteró de que en noruego, “skitten” (pronunciado “shittin”) es una palabra para sucio. Bueno, supongo que dije más de lo que había planeado.

.