An Aura of Saintliness

We had a brilliant New Year’s Eve with friends that would make anyone grateful. More on all that is still to come in a day or two. Here are some photos from Thursday night lights and dinner in Málaga. We hoped to catch the holiday light show at 9:00. We waited among the crowd until 9:20 and it still hadn’t begun. So we left to catch our 9:30 dinner reservation at El Meson de Cervantes.

MY EXQUISITELY DELICIOUS MOJITO.
MY TWO EXQUISITELY DELICIOUS MOJITOS.
(THE ONE AT LEFT BEGAN AS SAN GERALDO’S
EXQUISITELY DELICIOUS MOJITO.)
SECRETO IBERICO (PORK), BAKED PUMPKIN, AND PINEAPPLE MARMALADE;
CARILLADA (PORK) IN A CHOCOLATE SAUCE;
CHOCOLATE MOUSSE WITH RED BERRIES;
WARM APPLE TART.

The first time I saw San Geraldo (in 1981) was in Boston on a Sunday afternoon at a bar called Chaps. He was standing across the room from me and I could swear he was levitating and surrounded by a heavenly light.

The reality:
The grandson of kings was standing on a platform. Behind him were the pinball machines. Their electric lights provided the glow. I prefer my initial version better.


Most people who know San Geraldo say I’m the saint. Whether that’s true or not (and if you lived with San Geraldo for a minute, you would say it’s true) he really does make the world glow brighter.

THE CROWD AWAITS THE LIGHT SHOW.
STANDING OUT IN THE CROWD,
SAN GERALDO AND JUDYSHANNONSTREETWHAT.
JUDY NOTED IT WAS ALL ABOUT SAN GERALDO.

“Baby, I can feel your halo.”

Light Eating After Seeing The Lights

Our favorite restaurant in Málaga is now our favorite three restaurants in Málaga (and they have a fourth on the way). We discovered El Meson de Cervantes nearly six years ago during our first visit to Spain (eight months before moving here). Then, Matt and Lindy told us about their other restaurant, El Tapeo de Cervantes. And, now there’s a third restaurant, Vinería Cervantes. So, that’s where we went Monday night after we saw the light(s).

I’ve provided English descriptions beneath each photo. Their Spanish menu wouldn’t load for me to copy the info and their translations don’t always tell the whole story, but you’ll definitely get the idea.

It seems impossible we managed to eat all this. (But, click the pics and I think you’ll understand.)

SEA BREAM WRAPPED IN COURGETTE,
CARROT PUREE, AND A JUNIPER SAUCE.
RED PEPPERS STUFFED WITH COD
AND SERVED WITH A TOMATO SAUCE.
OXTAIL EMPANADILLAS.
BATTERED PRAWNS WITH TREACLE
AND A CORIANDER MAYONNAISE.
GRILLED OCTOPUS (IN AN INK SAUCE!!!) WITH SMOKED MASHED POTATOES.
(NONE FOR ME. THE SUCTION CUPS GET STUCK TO THE ROOF OF MY MOUTH.)
BOAR STEW WITH SWEET MÁLAGA WINE,
TOPPED BY A SPANISH TORTILLA.
FRIED EGGPLANT WITH TREACLE.
IBERIAN PORK WITH BAKED PUMPKIN.
PUMPKIN RISOTTO AND WILD MUSHROOMS.
WARM APPLE TART WITH VANILLA ICE CREAM.
(I DID NOT SHARE…)

Definitely Not Tom’s Diner

Monday night, after enjoying the Christmas lights in central Málaga, we headed over to El Meson de Cervantes for dinner. We’d been there a few times since our exploratory trip to Spain in January 2011. We really need to go a lot more often. We love everything about the place starting with the warm welcome we always receive. Fortunately, we got there a bit earlier — 8:15 — than is expected for Spanish dining. A half hour later and we probably wouldn’t have gotten a table.

THE ALAMEDA PRINCIPAL, MÁLAGA.

The hostess asked us if we had a reservation. We said, no, and San Geraldo put his hand out to be slapped.

I then told the hostess that San Geraldo used to be famous. “But not anymore. Does that help?”

He then jokingly mentioned his 22-greats grandfather San Fernando Rey (King Ferdinand III). I explained the relationship.

Abuelo is grandfather. Bisabuelo is great-grandfather. Tatara abuelo is great-grandfather. I said tatara-tatara-tatara… and finished with the number 22. By this point, we were all friends. One of the servers brought us to a table and told us it was the table for tataras. It’s important to note that the table was available whether or not San Fernando Rey had been Grandpa.

Everyone on staff was warm and friendly. It’s a team effort, so no one is ever ignored or in need. I had Secreto Ibérico, a pork dish I’ve had elsewhere a number of times (and loved). Nothing will ever hold a candle to this one: the pork, pineapple sauce, and a slice of pumpkin. It sounded odd to me, but the combination could not have been more perfect. I managed to include a little of each in every mouthful. We then had dessert, which you’ll see below.

We received kisses good-bye and just about danced through town to catch the train home.

SAN GERALDO’S SUCKLING PIG. 
SECRETO IBÉRICO.
SAN GERALDO’S CHOCOLATE MOUSSE WITH FRESH BERRIES.
MY NEW FAVOURITE DESSERT: SWEET-WINE MOUSSE, LIME SORBET, MANGO SAUCE,
AND A CRUNCHY PINE NUT TOPPING (UNDER THE LIME SORBET, TOO).

Whenever one of the servers passed our table, she would sing, “Tatara tatara tatara tatara.”

When A Horse Is Not A Horse

Nephew and niece-in-law, Matt and Lindy, took us out for dinner Saturday night. I don’t know how to describe how I feel about this loving, generous, kind, interesting, funny, joyful, caring, adventurous duo. (And not just because they treated for dinner either.) 

Matt and Lindy will be here for coffee Tuesday morning and will then head off on more travels Wednesday. Málaga seems to be becoming a second home for them. I sure wish they would make it their first!

Anyway, just a bit of temporary public art at a construction site. Seen Saturday night in Málaga on Calle Álamo, across the street from the excellent restaurant, El Meson de Cervantes.

(Click the images for a better look.)

Mr. Ed, television’s talking horse (1961–1966). 
Of course, of course…