Four days on Venus / Cuatro días en Venus

La versión en español está después de la versión en inglés.

THE CHAIR HARDWARE ARRIVED FROM IKEA yesterday. We’re all very happy. The rugs were supposed to take four days to complete. Since Wednesday was 13 days (subtract two holidays and two weekends and it was still more than four days), I phoned the shop early that afternoon. I thought perhaps they were simply expecting us to show up. No, I was told, they’d be ready either Wednesday or Thursday and, yes, they would call me. Well, it’s Friday and still no rugs. If the owner had told us when we asked that it was going to take two months to fill our order, we would have said fine. But he told us four days. Maybe he meant four days on Venus, where one day is 5,832 hours.

At least the chair is now a real chair. I sat in it once yesterday. San Geraldo hasn’t had a turn. Dudo and Moose have taken it as their own and I think they’ve even written up a schedule because they haven’t had any problems sharing. I wonder if we can get slotted in.

We had dinner with Tynan and Elena last night at Mesón Salvador (two dinners out in one week). I had an exceptional salad — goat cheese, lettuce, spinach, walnuts, raisins. It was my first time and it won’t be my last. Delicious! San Geraldo and I shared a slice of cheesecake. We finished with our Pionono chupitos (shots). Lolo and Adrian made us feel loved.

I had a great walk yesterday afternoon, and I caught an excellent example of Fuengirola fashion (I suppose it should be called Fuengirola Foreigners Fashion). Today was English lesson with Jesica. She’s doing amazingly well, and I’m learning lots of new Spanish words.

.

LOS TORNILLOS DE LA SILLA llegó de IKEA ayer. Estamos todos muy felices. Se suponía que las alfombras tardarían cuatro días en completarse. Como el miércoles eran 13 días (reste dos días festivos y dos fines de semana y todavía eran más de cuatro días), llamé a la tienda temprano esa tarde. Pensé que quizás simplemente estaban esperando que nos presentáramos. No, me dijeron, estarían listos el miércoles o el jueves y, sí, me llamarían. Bueno, es viernes y todavía no hay alfombras. Si el propietario nos hubiera dicho cuando le preguntamos que tomaría dos meses completar nuestro pedido, habríamos dicho que estaba bien. Pero nos dijo cuatro días. Quizás se refería a cuatro días en Venus, donde un día son 5.832 horas.

Al menos la silla ahora es una silla real. Me senté en ella una vez ayer. No creo que San Geraldo haya tenido un giro. Dudo y Moose lo han tomado como propio y creo que incluso han escrito un horario porque no han tenido ningún problema para compartir. Me pregunto si podemos ubicarnos.

Cenamos con Tynan y Elena anoche en Mesón Salvador (dos cenas en una semana). Comí una ensalada excepcional: queso de cabra, lechuga, espinaca, nueces, pasas. Fue mi primera vez y no será la última. ¡Delicioso! San Geraldo y yo compartimos una pieza de tarta de queso. Terminamos con nuestros chupitos de Pionono. Lolo y Adrian nos hicieron sentir amados.

Ayer por la tarde tuve un gran paseo, y pude ver un excelente ejemplo de la moda de Fuengirola (supongo que debería llamarse Moda de Extranjeros de Fuengirola). Hoy fue una lección de inglés con Jesica. Lo está haciendo increíblemente bien y estoy aprendiendo muchas palabras nuevas en español.

Love from Lolo. / Amor de Lolo.
Love from Adrian. / Amor de Adrian.

Food Savior / Salvador de Comida

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

AS LONG AS we’re talking about food (yesterday’s post), I thought I’d take you with us to Mesón Salvador. The restaurant was named for the original owner, current owner José’s father, Salvador. Salvador translates to “Savior,” hence the title of this post. We started out there today for coffee and stuck around for a paella lunch.

Another day, we both enjoyed flamenquín (slices of jamón serrano wrapped in pork loin, coated with egg and breadcrumbs, and deep-fried). It was first created in Córdoba Province, and I just learned that the name (which means “little Flemish”) derives from its golden color that resembled the blond hair of the Flemish assistants who came to Spain with the Emperor Charles V. Aren’t you thrilled to know that?

We didn’t have dessert today (since we both had ice cream last night). But we haven’t gone without dessert on other recent visits to Mesón Salvador. One perfect evening this week, while waiting for our dinner to arrive, Sergio told us we needed to take a peek in the kitchen. Chef Miguel was putting the finishing touches on a tray of milhojas (layers of cream between layers of pastry). The word translates, appropriately, to “A Thousand Leaves.” The cream this time was flavored with berries (fruit of the forest). We felt obligated to share a big slab, just to be polite.

Another night, I had their baked cheesecake, which I think I’ve mentioned is as good as (and maybe better than) the New York–style cheesecake I love. Then there was “Grandma’s Cake.” Nothing like MY grandma used to make, but so, so good.

I thought I had downloaded our milhojas dessert photo but I promptly lost it. So Lolo kindly removed a platter from the dessert case the next morning.

Don’t worry. Lolo didn’t breathe on the milhojas. The tray was much further from his face than it appears in the photo, which reminds me of a T-shirt I once bought for someone I love. It was similar to the message often printed on side-view mirrors in cars. “Objects under this shirt are larger than they appear.” She got a kick out of it, but I don’t think she ever wore it.

.

MIENTRAS HABLAMOS DE comida (la publicación de ayer), pensé en llevarte con nosotros a Mesón Salvador. El restaurante lleva el nombre del propietario original, el padre del dueño José, Salvador. Hoy comenzamos a tomar café y nos quedamos a comer paella.

Otro día, ambos disfrutamos el flamenquín. Se creó por primera vez en la provincia de Córdoba, y acabo de enterarme de que el nombre deriva de su color dorado que se parecía al cabello rubio de los asistentes flamencos que vinieron a España con el Emperador Carlos V. ¿No te emociona saber eso?

Hoy no comimos postre (ya que los dos tuvimos helado anoche). Pero no hemos pasado sin postre en otras visitas recientes a Mesón Salvador. Una noche perfecta esta semana, mientras esperaba que llegara nuestra cena, Sergio nos dijo que necesitábamos echar un vistazo en la cocina. El chef Miguel estaba dando los últimos toques a una bandeja de milhojas (capas de crema entre capas de masa). La crema esta vez fue aromatizada con bayas (fruto del bosque). Nos sentimos obligados a compartir una gran losa, solo para ser educados.

Otra noche, tuve su tarta de queso horneado, que creo que he mencionado es tan bueno (y tal vez mejor que) la tarta de queso al estilo de Nueva York que amo. Luego estaba “Tarta de la abuela”. Nada como mi abuela solía hacer, pero muy, muy bueno.

Pensé que había descargado nuestra foto de postre de milhojas, pero la perdí rápidamente. Así que Lolo sacó amablemente un plato a la mañana siguiente.

No te preocupes. Lolo no respiraba en las milhojas. El plato estaba mucho más lejos de su cara de lo que parece en la foto, lo que me recuerda a una camiseta que una vez compré para alguien que amo. Era similar al mensaje que a menudo se imprime en los espejos laterales de los automóviles. “Los objetos debajo de esta camisa son más grandes de lo que parecen”. Le gustó mucho, pero no creo que lo haya usado nunca.

Paella
Flamenquin
Baked cheesecake / Tarta de queso horneado
Grandma’s cake / Tarta de la abuela
Lolo and the milhojas / Lolo y las milhojas

Another Day Older / Otra Día Más Viejo

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

IN THE PAST, San Geraldo would argue that he wouldn’t be “over” 71 until his 72nd birthday. This discussion began more than 20 years ago, the day after his 50th birthday, when our neighborhood bank posted a sign offering special savings accounts for customers over 50. SG snapped, “Well, what does THAT mean? Do you have to be 51?” I said, “No, YOU’RE over 50 now.” What followed was an “Am-not, Are-too,” argument that went nowhere. The bank should have simply written “50 and Over” and saved us the trouble.

After SG’s first birthday celebration in Fuengirola (in 2014), we shared this disagreement with an acquaintance — a very clever woman named Heather. Heather looked at San Geraldo and asked, “So, before your first birthday, were you nought?”

Today, San Geraldo is over 71. But I don’t think he cares. Yesterday morning he was feted and loved at Mesón Salvador — where he surprised them with an earlier-than-expected entrance and was made to turn back and wait in the wings until they could coordinate the candles and the music (the first video). Cheese cake topped with berries and so much love.

And last night we had a joyful dinner at Primavera with Tynan and Elena — where Miguel (second video) perfectly coordinated the candles (I brought the candelabra), although the song was acapella. Tiramisu; slices of chocolate cake; and fresh ice cream — turón, straciattela, and vanilla. Plus exquisite natural cava. Today just might be sugar free.

.

EN EL PASADO, San Geraldo argumentaba que no estaría mayor de 71 hasta su 72 cumpleaños. Esta discusión comenzó hace más de 20 años, el día después de su 50 cumpleaños, cuando nuestro banco del vecindario publicó un letrero que ofrecía cuentas de ahorro especiales para clientes mayores de 50 años. SG respondió: “Bueno, ¿qué significa ESO? ¿Tiene que tener 51 años?”. Dije: “No, ahora tienes más de 50 años”. Lo que siguió fue un argumento de “No soy; sí eres”, que no llegó a ningún lado. El banco simplemente debería haber escrito “50 y más” y nos ahorró el problema.

Luego, después de la celebración del primer cumpleaños de SG en Fuengirola (en 2014), compartimos este desacuerdo con una conocids, una mujer muy inteligente llamada Heather. Heather miró a San Geraldo y preguntó: “Entonces, antes de tu primer cumpleaños, ¿no eras nada?”

Hoy, San Geraldo tiene más de 71 años. Pero no creo que le importe. Ayer por la mañana fue festejado y amado en Mesón Salvador, donde los sorprendió con una entrada antes de lo esperado y lo obligaron a retroceder y esperar en las alas hasta que pudieran coordinar las velas y la música (el primer video). Tarta de queso con frutas de bosque… ¡y nata!

Y anoche tuvimos una cena alegre en Primavera con Tynan y Elena, donde Miguel (segundo video) coordinó perfectamente las velas (traje el candelabro), aunque la canción era acapella. Tiramisu; rebanadas de pastel de chocolate; y helado fresco: turón, straciattela y vainilla. Más exquisito cava natural. Hoy podría ser sin azúcar.

.

Pa Pa Pa Pa…

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

LEARNING TO READ and write is exciting and liberating for anyone at any age. My maternal grandmother taught herself to read Hebrew as a child simply so she could pray like her father (girls in her village in Russia did not “need” to be educated). She finally learned to read and write English when she was in her 60s so she could become an American citizen. (There she is above with my sister Dale in 1952.)

You may remember that my pal Luke has begun that process by imitating his teacher-mother Kathleen’s online English lessons (click here). Luke’s papa, Pedro, recently wrote the word PAPA on Luke’s blackboard so that he could copy it, which he did. Pedro then pointed to the first two letters and said, “P – A. Pa.”

Luke repeated while pointing at the letters, “P – A. Pa.”

Pedro was beside himself with pride. He continued (and I’m paraphrasing; Pedro did a much better job). Pointing at the two pairs of letters, he said, “So this says Pa… and this is the same. What do you get when you put them together? Pa…?”

Luke was ecstatic. “MONDAY!!!” he exclaimed.

And I suppose that’s what is meant by ‘back to the drawing board.’

.

APRENDER A LEER y escribir es emocionante y liberador para cualquier persona de cualquier edad. Mi abuela materna se enseñó a leer y escribir hebreo de niña para poder rezar como su padre (las niñas en su pueblo en Rusia no “necesitaban” ser educadas). Finalmente aprendió a leer y escribir inglés cuando ella tenía 60 años para poder convertirse en ciudadana estadounidense. (Allí está arriba con mi hermana Dale en 1952.)

Puedes recordar que mi amigo Luke ha comenzado ese proceso imitando las lecciones de inglés en línea de su maestra-madre Kathleen (haz clic aquí). El papá de Luke, Pedro, recientemente escribió la palabra PAPA en el pizarrón para poder copiarlo, lo cual hizo maravillosamente. Pedro luego señaló las dos primeras letras y dijo: “P – A. Pa”.

Luke repitió brillantemente mientras señalaba las letras, “P – A. Pa”.

Pedro estaba fuera de sí con orgullo. Él continuó (y estoy parafraseando; Pedro hizo un trabajo mucho mejor). Señalando los dos pares de letras, dijo: “Entonces esto dice Pa … y esto es lo mismo. ¿Qué obtienes cuando los juntas? Pa…?”

Luke estaba extasiado. “¡MONDAY [LUNES]!”, exclamó.

Y supongo que eso es lo que se entiende por “volver al tablero de dibujo”.

MONDAY!!! [MONDAY]
Cocido. Not only can Pedro teach, he can cook. Although he can’t teach ME to cook (because in my case, ignorance is bliss).
Cocido. Pedro no solo puede enseñar, sino que también puede cocinar. Aunque no puede enseñarme a cocinar (porque en mi caso, la ignorancia es una bendición).
Pedro’s homemade cheesecake with fresh raspberry topping. PAPA!
Tarta de casa de Pedro con salsa de fresas frescas. ¡PAPÁ!
With Aunt Fran (Francesca) in background. Luke calls her Flan, which I think is delicious.
Con Tía Fran (Francesca) en el fondo. Luke la llama Flan, que creo que es delicioso.

Hanging To The Right / Colgando A La Derecha

La versión español está después de la versión inglés.

We spent Christmas Day with friends Pedro, Kathleen, and Luke, and some of their extended family. Of course, it was a day filled with love and laughter and it makes me grateful for how lucky we are to have each other. And, yes, that is one creepy Santa in their Christmas photo.

Once Master Baker San Geraldo had his pie crusts in the oven, he discovered something that screwed up his pie plans. He bought corn flour instead of cornstarch. So, he muttered and cursed and then headed to our local bakery which is, thankfully, almost never closed. The store-bought cakes were OK, but nothing compares to San Geraldo’s baked goods.

Here are some photos of the deliciousness of the day, prepared by Pedro, Kathleen, and Kathleen’s cousin Marguerite.

Be sure to watch the video of last week’s “tree trimming.” Kathleen had a little trouble getting things to hang straight. Pedro didn’t seem to care.

Pasamos el día de Navidad con los amigos Pedro, Kathleen, y Luke, y algunos de sus familiares. Por supuesto, fue un día lleno de amor y risas y me siento agradecido por la suerte que tenemos de tenernos el uno al otro. Y, sí, esa es un Papá Noel espeluznante en su foto de Navidad.

Cuando el maestro panadero San Geraldo tenía sus cortezas de pastel en el horno, descubrió algo que arruinó sus planes de pastel. Compró harina de maíz en lugar de maicena. Entonces, él murmuró, maldijo y luego se dirigió a nuestra panadería local que, afortunadamente, casi nunca cierra. Las tartas de la panedería fueron bien, pero nada se compara con los productos horneados de San Geraldo.

Aquí hay algunas fotos de lo delicioso del día de Pedro, Kathleen, y Marguerite (prima de Kathleen).

Asegúrate de ver el video del “adornando el árbol ” de la semana pasada. Kathleen tuvo un poco de dificultad para hacer que las cosas colgar derecho. A Pedro no parecía importarle.

“Hash” Soup (with Iberian ham and hardboiled egg) / Sopa de Picadillo.
Pedro’s Stuffed Pork Loin / Lomo de Cerdo Relleno de Pedro.

By Christmas Day, Kathleen had that tree-topper standing straight. (No wonder she’s pregnant again.)
A partir del día de Navidad, Kathleen tenía esa copa de árbol de navidad erguida.
(No es de extrañar que esté embarazada otra vez).